The second annual State of the Arts conference, organised by the RSA and Arts Council England, brought together a wide range of creative voices to debate issues around resilience, audience and the value of arts and culture. Videos from each of the day's sessions can be viewed below. 

Welcome address

Speakers: Matthew Taylor, Chief Executive, RSA; Alan Davey, Chief Executive, Arts Council England.

Keynote Panel: 'To be realists we must first be visionaries': Part 1

Chair: Matthew Taylor, Chief Executive, RSA
Speakers: Hon Ed Vaizey MP, Minister for Culture, Communications and Creative Industries; Sandy Nairne, Director, National Portrait Gallery.

Keynote Panel: What is the vision for the arts beyond the cuts?: Part 2

Chair: Matthew Taylor, Chief Executive, RSA
Speakers: Hon Ed Vaizey MP, Minister for Culture, Communications and Creative Industries; Sandy Nairne, Director, National Portrait Gallery.

Panel: Where are the new audiences?

Chair: Diane Ragsdale, Promovendus, Erasmus University, Cultural Economics
Speakers: Julia Peyton-Jones OBE, Director, The Serpentine Gallery; Ed Whiting, Founder, WeDidThis; Peter Bazalgette, Media Consultant and Digital Media Investor; Marcelle Speller, founder and owner, LocalGiving.com; Erica Whyman, Chief Executive, Northern Stage

With deep funding cuts on the way, our cultural institutions must learn new ways of harnessing private philanthropy. Whilst some individual arts organisations have developed sophisticated fundraising strategies, the arts as a whole lacks a coherent rationale for its 'ask'. So what needs to change? How do we need to rethink cultural philanthropy and what can we learn from elsewhere?

Panel: Reimagining artistic innovation

Chair: Razia Iqbal, Special correspondent, BBC
Speakers: Alex Farquharson, Director, Nottingham Contemporary; Peter Gregson, Cellist and composer; Emma Gladstone, Producer, Sadlers Wells; Andy Field, Co-director, Forest Fringe; Ruth Mackenzie OBE, Director, Cultural Olympiad

The ways that artists create and share new work are multiplying and changing at breakneck speed. Traditional notions of 'the new' and innovation are challenged by this, but it's all too easy for the debate to focus on how art is made and produced, rather than the art itself. This session is about the nature and role of innovation in art, and about the ways in which artists keep their work alive and contemporary. 

Panel: Making the arts more resilient

Chair: Clare Cooper, Co-Founder and Co-Director, Mission Models Money
Speakers: Martin Sutherland, Chief Executive, Royal & Derngate Theatres, Northampton; Shreela Ghosh, Director, Free Word Centre; Tony Nwachukwu, Music producer; Clare Reddington, Director, iShed and Pervasive Media Studio, Watershed

The resilience of people and organisations working in the arts is clearly going to be severely tested in the years ahead. As yet, new ways of thinking and organising which will enable greater adaptivity and resilience are still evolving - whether that be in the form of new leadership approaches; new financial models and instruments; or new approaches to collaboration and partnership. 

Panel: Cultural Question Time

Chair: Anne McElvoy, Public policy editor, The Economist
Speakers: Alan Davey, Chief Executive, Arts Council England; Yasmin Alibhai-Brown, Journalist and author; Josie Rourke, Leading theatre director; Gloria De Piero, Shadow Minister for Culture 2010; Rt Hon Don Foster, MP for Bath, Co-Chair of the Liberal Democrat, Parliamentary Policy Committee on Culture, Olympics, Media and Sport

This year's State of the Arts conference is being run more interactively than the 2010 event, with written provocations prepared in advance, a table discussion in the opening keynote session, and with the use of social media to generate questions both prior to the event and on the day. This session is designed to give a platform for these questions arising from the written provocations, social media activity leading up to the event, and table discussions during the opening keynote session to be fully explored. 

Panel: Rethinking cultural philanthropy

Chair: Diane Ragsdale, Promovendus, Erasmus University, Cultural Economics
Speakers: Julia Peyton-Jones OBE, Director, The Serpentine Gallery; Ed Whiting, Founder, WeDidThis; Peter Bazalgette, Media consultant and digital media investor; Marcelle Speller, Founder and owner, LocalGiving.com; Erica Whyman, Chief Executive, Northern Stage

With deep funding cuts on the way, our cultural institutions must learn new ways of harnessing private philanthropy. Whilst some individual arts organisations have developed sophisticated fundraising strategies, the arts as a whole lacks a coherent rationale for its 'ask'. So what needs to change? How do we need to rethink cultural philanthropy and what can we learn from elsewhere?

Panel: Should the arts lead the Big Society?

Chair: Matthew Taylor, Chief Executive, RSA
Speakers: Caoimhin Corrigan, Cultural Broker, ILEX Derry/Londonderry; Miranda McKearney OBE, Director, Reading Agency; Jesse Norman MP, Hereford and South Herefordshire; Andrew Dixon, Director, Creative Scotland; Gavin Stride, Director, Farnham Maltings & Caravan

If a Big Society involves, as the Prime Minister has implied, an ability to develop conceptions of the good life which go beyond possessive individualism, artists are well placed to explore such ideas in their practice. But shouldn't the ambitions for the arts here be broader? Surely the arts should be aiming to give people greater voice, civic pride, and encouraging people to take an active role in civic society? 

Panel: Are the arts complacent about talent and diversity?

Chair: Vanessa Trevelyan, President, Museums Association
Speakers: Kerry Michael, Artistic Director and Chief Executive, Theatre Royal Stratford; Baba Israel, Director, Manchester's Contact Theatre; Mark Williams MBE, Artistic director, Heart n Soul; Clary Salandy, Mahogany & Artists Taking The Lead

Few in the arts would dispute the importance of encouraging diverse talent and presenting a diverse range of work. But are the arts conscientiously concerned, rather than committed, to real change? Has there been any significant change to what we regard as mainstream arts in recent years, and what has this meant for the art and for audiences? What else do we need to do and how urgent is it? 

Keynote Panel: What needs to change?

Chair: Dame Liz Forgan, Chair, Arts Council England
Speakers: Candace Allen, Author, political and cultural commentator; John Knell, Leading cultural policy strategist; Ivan Lewis MP, Shadow Secretary of State for Culture, Media And Sport; Jonathan Mills, Director, Edinburgh International Festival; Mark Wallinger, Turner Prize-winning artist

During the course of conference, attendees have debated the challenges facing the arts, competing visions about how to ensure the arts remain relevant and vital, and about how they can secure greater resilience and support. What stands in the way of these visions of how the arts are going to matter and thrive in the future? What are the big shifts required? What are the big changes that will need to happen in the arts if the aspirations of the sector are going to be met in the future?

Closing remarks

Speakers: Alan Davey, Chief Executive, Arts Council England; Luke Johnson, Chairman, RSA