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Royal Opera House

The Royal Opera House houses the UK’s leading Opera and Ballet companies, and plays host to a wide range of visiting companies and artists.  Through its programme on the main stage, in the Linbury Studio, the Clore Studio and in spaces throughout the building it presents many forms of classical and contemporary opera and dance. Our funding is a contribution towards its core costs.

Funding awards

  • 2012-2013: £25,208,100
  • 2013-2014: £25,787,886
  • 2014-2015: £26,430,076

Video feed

The Caterpillar in Alice's Adventures in Wonderland (The Royal Ballet)

Sarah Lamb as Alice and Eric Underwood, Christina Arestis, Olivia Cowley, Melissa Hamilton and Nathalie Harrison as the Caterpillar in Christopher Wheeldon's ballet Alice's Adventures in Wonderland Recorded for cinema broadcast on 28 March 2013. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/alice Christopher Wheeldon’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland arrived on the stage in 2011 with a burst of colour, theatrical magic and inventive choreography. It was The Royal Ballet’s first new full-length work since 1995 and was greeted with delight by audiences. Joby Talbot’s score combines contemporary soundworlds with sweeping melodies that gesture to ballet scores of the 19th century. Bob Crowley’s wildly imaginative sets and costumes draw on puppetry, projections and masks to make Wonderland wonderfully real. Alice encounters a cast of extraordinary characters, from the highly-strung Queen of Hearts, who performs a hilarious send-up of The Sleeping Beauty's famous Rose Adage, to dancing playing cards, a sinuous caterpillar and a tap-dancing Mad Hatter. Alice and the Knave of Hearts dance a tender, loving pas de deux of delicate beauty. But the ballet does not avoid the darker undercurrents of Lewis Carroll’s story – a nightmarish kitchen, an eerily disembodied Cheshire Cat and the unhinged tea party are all created in vivid detail.al Ballet as the Caterpillar in Christopher Wheeldon's ballet Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, cinema broadcast on 28 March 2013. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/alice Christopher Wheeldon’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland arrived on the stage in 2011 with a burst of colour, theatrical magic and inventive choreography. It was The Royal Ballet’s first new full-length work since 1995 and was greeted with delight by audiences. Joby Talbot’s score combines contemporary soundworlds with sweeping melodies that gesture to ballet scores of the 19th century. Bob Crowley’s wildly imaginative sets and costumes draw on puppetry, projections and masks to make Wonderland wonderfully real. Alice encounters a cast of extraordinary characters, from the highly-strung Queen of Hearts, who performs a hilarious send-up of The Sleeping Beauty's famous Rose Adage, to dancing playing cards, a sinuous caterpillar and a tap-dancing Mad Hatter. Alice and the Knave of Hearts dance a tender, loving pas de deux of delicate beauty. But the ballet does not avoid the darker undercurrents of Lewis Carroll’s story – a nightmarish kitchen, an eerily disembodied Cheshire Cat and the unhinged tea party are all created in vivid detail.

Manon: Darcey Bussell and Deborah MacMillan on Kenneth MacMillan's masterpiece (The Royal Ballet)

Former Principal of The Royal Ballet, Darcey Bussell and wife of Kenneth MacMillan, Deborah MacMillan on the choreographer's ballet masterpiece, Manon. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/Manon Kenneth MacMillan began work on Manon shortly after the birth of his only daughter. His source was the 18th-century French novel by Abbé Prévost, already adapted twice for opera by Massenet and Puccini. Renowned dance musician Leighton Lucas and his assistant Hilda Gaunt provided a score made from a patchwork of works by Massenet, including his famous yearning Elégie as the theme for the lovers. The premiere was given on 7 March 1974, the lead roles of Manon and Des Grieux danced by Antoinette Sibley and Anthony Dowell. The ballet quickly became a staple of The Royal Ballet's repertory. MacMillan found new sympathy with the capricious Manon, bringing his customary psychological insight and the memories of his own impoverished upbringing. He described his heroine as 'not so much afraid of being poor as ashamed of being poor'. Designs by MacMillan's friend Nicholas Georgiadis reflect this, depicting a world of lavish splendour polluted by miserable poverty. MacMillan's spectacular ensemble scenes for the whole Company create vivid, complex portraits of the distinct societies of Paris and New Orleans. But it is Manon and Des Grieux's impassioned pas de deux – recalling the intensity of MacMillan's earlier work, Romeo and Juliet – that drive this tragic story, and make Manon one of MacMillan's most heartbreaking dramas.

Antonio Pappano introduces the music of Verdi's I due Foscari (The Royal Opera)

Music director of The Royal Opera Antonio Pappano on the music of Verdi's tragic opera, I due Foscari. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/foscari I due Foscari, Verdi's sixth opera, is one of his darkest and saddest. At its heart is a father's realization that there is nothing he can do to protect his family against the world's cruelties. The 31-year-old composer may well have drawn on his own devastating experience of losing his wife and two infant children a few years earlier. But despite the opera's sombre soul, the music for I due Foscari contains exhilarating forerunners of Verdi's later style – particularly in the fiercely virtuosic writing for the heroine Lucrezia and her magnificent duets with the Doge in Act I and with her doomed husband in Act II. American director Thaddeus Strassberger, making his Royal Opera debut, depicts a Venice that is rotten to its core. Mattie Ullrich's opulent costume designs reference the opera’s 15th-century setting while suggesting the corruption lurking beneath. The spare sets of award-winning British designer Kevin Knight illustrate the Foscaris' isolation and the decay of the city, before flaring out into grand guignol for the opera's brilliant Act III carnival.

The cast and creative team introduce I due Foscari (The Royal Opera)

Thaddeus Strassberger, Plácido Domingo, Antonio Pappano, Francesco Meli, Maria Agresta on I due Foscari. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/foscari I due Foscari, Verdi's sixth opera, is one of his darkest and saddest. At its heart is a father's realization that there is nothing he can do to protect his family against the world's cruelties. The 31-year-old composer may well have drawn on his own devastating experience of losing his wife and two infant children a few years earlier. But despite the opera's sombre soul, the music for I due Foscari contains exhilarating forerunners of Verdi's later style – particularly in the fiercely virtuosic writing for the heroine Lucrezia and her magnificent duets with the Doge in Act I and with her doomed husband in Act II. American director Thaddeus Strassberger, making his Royal Opera debut, depicts a Venice that is rotten to its core. Mattie Ullrich's opulent costume designs reference the opera’s 15th-century setting while suggesting the corruption lurking beneath. The spare sets of award-winning British designer Kevin Knight illustrate the Foscaris' isolation and the decay of the city, before flaring out into grand guignol for the opera's brilliant Act III carnival.

Show 21 more videos

Antonio Pappano and Plácido Domingo in conversation - Extract (The Royal Opera)

Antonio Pappano and Plácido Domingo discuss Domingo's role as Francesco Foscari in Verdi's tragic opera, I due Foscari. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/foscari I due Foscari, Verdi's sixth opera, is one of his darkest and saddest. At its heart is a father's realization that there is nothing he can do to protect his family against the world's cruelties. The 31-year-old composer may well have drawn on his own devastating experience of losing his wife and two infant children a few years earlier. But despite the opera's sombre soul, the music for I due Foscari contains exhilarating forerunners of Verdi's later style – particularly in the fiercely virtuosic writing for the heroine Lucrezia and her magnificent duets with the Doge in Act I and with her doomed husband in Act II. American director Thaddeus Strassberger, making his Royal Opera debut, depicts a Venice that is rotten to its core. Mattie Ullrich's opulent costume designs reference the opera’s 15th-century setting while suggesting the corruption lurking beneath. The spare sets of award-winning British designer Kevin Knight illustrate the Foscaris' isolation and the decay of the city, before flaring out into grand guignol for the opera's brilliant Act III carnival.

Ashton's Devil's Holiday Variation

Viacheslav Samodurov performs Frederick Ashton's Devil's Holiday Variation Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk

Ashton's Awakening Pas de deux

Darcey Bussell and Jonathan Cope perform a pas de deux from Frederick Ashton's Awakening. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk

Ashton's Devil's Holiday Pas de deux

Laura Morera and Ricardo Cervera perform a pas de deux from Frederick Ashton's Devil's Holiday. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk

Ashton's La Valse

The Royal Ballet's Corps de ballet perform Frederick Ashton's La Valse. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/la-valse-by-frederick-ashton By the 20th century the Viennese waltz was a fading art form. Maurice Ravel’s score was commissioned by dance impresario Serge Diaghilev for the Ballets Russes company. Although Diaghilev never used the score – claiming it was not a ballet but ‘the portrait of a ballet’ – both Bronislava Nijinska and George Balanchine choreographed powerful works for it. Having danced in Nijinska’s 1929 version, Frederick Ashton created his own evocative interpretation in 1958. Ashton’s La Valse depicts the distant world of 19th-century Imperial Vienna. The stage is filled with dancers in tailcoats and ball gowns, who whirl beneath golden chandeliers and elegant drapes. A driving, visceral rhythm underlies the swooping waltz melodies, gradually growing in intensity and ultimately overwhelming the music – interpreted by some critics as a representation of the destruction wrought by World War I and of the decline of the Imperial world.

Ashton's Voices of Spring

Leanne Benjamin and Carlos Acosta perform Frederick Ashton's Voices of Spring. http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/voices-of-spring-by-frederick-ashton Voices of Spring is set to the Frühlingsstimmen waltz (1883) by Johann Strauss II. Frederick Ashton created the piece for The Royal Opera’s 1977 production of Strauss’s Die Fledermaus, where it replaced one of the score’s original numbers in the second-act ball scene. The piece was renamed Voices of Spring and given its first performance independent from the operetta in a gala in Los Angeles the following year. From the opening tableau through to the dance’s low lifts, Ashton’s steps interpret the sense of effortless, gravity-defying movement that defines the waltz.

Ashton's Méditation from Thaïs Pas de deux

Mara Galeazzi and Thiago Soares perform a pas de deux from Frederick Ashton's Méditation from Thaïs. http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/meditation-from-thas-by-frederick-ashton Frederick Ashton’s Méditation from Thaïs is set to the flowing melodies of the Méditation religieuse from Jules Massenet’s opera Thaïs (1894). Ashton complements the ethereal and romantic mood of the music with a lyrical love duet. Anthony Dowell, former director of The Royal Ballet, designed the costumes and also appeared in the work’s first performance at the Adelphi Theatre in 1971, alongside Antoinette Sibley.

L'elisir d'amore trailer (The Royal Opera)

Laurent Pelly's acclaimed production of Donizetti's opera radiates tenderness, humour and southern sunshine. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/lelisir L'elisir d'amore is one of the most frequently performed of all Donizetti's operas. It combines a touching love story and hilarious comedy with beautiful music, including the much-loved aria 'Una furtiva lagrima'. The opera’s premiere in Milan in 1832 was a triumph and secured Donizetti's place as one of the leading Italian opera composers of his day. The Royal Opera's charming production is set in the sun-drenched countryside of 1950s Italy, complete with haystacks, Vespas and even a stray dog. It is injected with lively, visual humour, from Nemorino's tipsy clowning to Dulcamara's lumbering truck from which he sells his quack remedies. Donizetti deftly brings his characters alive with a sparkling score: Nemorino's love for Adina is expressed through lyrical arias; Adina’s animated, flamboyant style softens as her feelings towards Nemorino begin to change – and all the while Dulcamara endlessly chatters away with irrepressible self-belief.

Glare trailer (The Royal Opera)

Danish-German composer Søren Nils Eichberg presents a taut operatic thriller about trust and reality. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/glare Søren Nils Eichberg, winner of the prestigious Queen Elisabeth Competition and Danish National Symphony Orchestra's first composer in residence, has won widespread acclaim for his orchestral and chamber music. These include his award-winning Qilaatersorneq (2001) and the symphonies 'Stürtzen wir uns ins Feuer' (2005) and 'Before Heaven, Before Earth' (2010). All his music is characterized by a powerful rhythmic drive and rich orchestral colour. Glare is Eichberg's much-anticipated Royal Opera debut. German poet Hannah Dügben provides an original libretto that explores a tense web of human relationships. Thaddeus Strassberger, director of The Royal Opera's production of I due Foscari, joins a creative team of his regular collaborators, designer Madeleine Boyd and lighting designer Matt Haskins (whose joint credits include Opera North's Don Giovanni). Thanks to Genesis Housing Association for letting us use their location. http://www.genesisha.org.uk

Royal Opera House Winter 2014/15 - Life Reimagined Promo

Find out what's on at the Royal Opera House at http://www.roh.org.uk Winter 2014/15 highlights include a new production of Andrea Chénier starring Jonas Kaufmann, a new production of Verdi’s tragic Un ballo in maschera and The Royal Ballet in John Cranko’s emotionally charged Onegin. The Royal Opera, under the direction of Antonio Pappano, is one of the world’s leading opera companies. Based in the iconic Covent Garden theatre, it is renowned both for its outstanding performances of traditional opera and for commissioning new works by today’s leading opera composers, such as Harrison Birtwistle, Mark-Anthony Turnage and Thomas Adès. The Royal Ballet, led by Director Kevin O'Hare, is Britain’s largest ballet company. The Company has a wide-ranging repertory showcasing the great classical ballets, heritage works from Founder Choreographer Frederick Ashton and Principal Choreographer Kenneth MacMillan, as well as new works by the foremost choreographers of today.

In Conversation with Plácido Domingo

Plácido Domingo talks with The Royal Opera's Director of Music Antonio Pappano about his life and career. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk

Plácido Domingo on I due Foscari

Plácido Domingo talks to Antonio Pappano about I due Foscari. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/foscari I due Foscari, Verdi's sixth opera, is one of his darkest and saddest. At its heart is a father's realization that there is nothing he can do to protect his family against the world's cruelties. The 31-year-old composer may well have drawn on his own devastating experience of losing his wife and two infant children a few years earlier. But despite the opera's sombre soul, the music for I due Foscari contains exhilarating forerunners of Verdi's later style – particularly in the fiercely virtuosic writing for the heroine Lucrezia and her magnificent duets with the Doge in Act I and with her doomed husband in Act II. American director Thaddeus Strassberger, making his Royal Opera debut, depicts a Venice that is rotten to its core. Mattie Ullrich's opulent costume designs reference the opera’s 15th-century setting while suggesting the corruption lurking beneath. The spare sets of award-winning British designer Kevin Knight illustrate the Foscaris' isolation and the decay of the city, before flaring out into grand guignol for the opera's brilliant Act III carnival.

The cast and creative team on the choreography and characters in Manon

Dancers Marianela Nuñez, Federico Bonelli, Ricardo Cervera, and Christopher Saunders, with stager Julie Lincoln, introduce the characters and choreography in MacMillan's Manon. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/manon Kenneth MacMillan began work on Manon shortly after the birth of his only daughter. His source was the 18th-century French novel by Abbé Prévost, already adapted twice for opera by Massenet and Puccini. Renowned dance musician Leighton Lucas and his assistant Hilda Gaunt provided a score made from a patchwork of works by Massenet, including his famous yearning Elégie as the theme for the lovers. The premiere was given on 7 March 1974, the lead roles of Manon and Des Grieux danced by Antoinette Sibley and Anthony Dowell. The ballet quickly became a staple of The Royal Ballet's repertory. MacMillan found new sympathy with the capricious Manon, bringing his customary psychological insight and the memories of his own impoverished upbringing. He described his heroine as 'not so much afraid of being poor as ashamed of being poor'. Designs by MacMillan's friend Nicholas Georgiadis reflect this, depicting a world of lavish splendour polluted by miserable poverty. MacMillan's spectacular ensemble scenes for the whole Company create vivid, complex portraits of the distinct societies of Paris and New Orleans. But it is Manon and Des Grieux's impassioned pas de deux – recalling the intensity of MacMillan's earlier work, Romeo and Juliet – that drive this tragic story, and make Manon one of MacMillan's most heartbreaking dramas.

Manon: Federico Bonelli and Marianela Nuñez introduce Act 3 (The Royal Ballet)

Principal Dancers of The Royal Ballet Federico Bonelli and Marianela Nuñez introduce the final act of Kenneth MacMillan's masterpiece, Manon. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/Manon Kenneth MacMillan began work on Manon shortly after the birth of his only daughter. His source was the 18th-century French novel by Abbé Prévost, already adapted twice for opera by Massenet and Puccini. Renowned dance musician Leighton Lucas and his assistant Hilda Gaunt provided a score made from a patchwork of works by Massenet, including his famous yearning Elégie as the theme for the lovers. The premiere was given on 7 March 1974, the lead roles of Manon and Des Grieux danced by Antoinette Sibley and Anthony Dowell. The ballet quickly became a staple of The Royal Ballet's repertory. MacMillan found new sympathy with the capricious Manon, bringing his customary psychological insight and the memories of his own impoverished upbringing. He described his heroine as 'not so much afraid of being poor as ashamed of being poor'. Designs by MacMillan's friend Nicholas Georgiadis reflect this, depicting a world of lavish splendour polluted by miserable poverty. MacMillan's spectacular ensemble scenes for the whole Company create vivid, complex portraits of the distinct societies of Paris and New Orleans. But it is Manon and Des Grieux's impassioned pas de deux – recalling the intensity of MacMillan's earlier work, Romeo and Juliet – that drive this tragic story, and make Manon one of MacMillan's most heartbreaking dramas.

Laura Morera on playing the role of Manon (The Royal Ballet)

Royal Ballet Principal Laura Morera talks about her experiences playing Manon and how every dancer brings something unique to the role. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/manon Kenneth MacMillan began work on Manon shortly after the birth of his only daughter. His source was the 18th-century French novel by Abbé Prévost, already adapted twice for opera by Massenet and Puccini. Renowned dance musician Leighton Lucas and his assistant Hilda Gaunt provided a score made from a patchwork of works by Massenet, including his famous yearning Elégie as the theme for the lovers. The premiere was given on 7 March 1974, the lead roles of Manon and Des Grieux danced by Antoinette Sibley and Anthony Dowell. The ballet quickly became a staple of The Royal Ballet's repertory. MacMillan found new sympathy with the capricious Manon, bringing his customary psychological insight and the memories of his own impoverished upbringing. He described his heroine as 'not so much afraid of being poor as ashamed of being poor'. Designs by MacMillan's friend Nicholas Georgiadis reflect this, depicting a world of lavish splendour polluted by miserable poverty. MacMillan's spectacular ensemble scenes for the whole Company create vivid, complex portraits of the distinct societies of Paris and New Orleans. But it is Manon and Des Grieux's impassioned pas de deux – recalling the intensity of MacMillan's earlier work, Romeo and Juliet – that drive this tragic story, and make Manon one of MacMillan's most heartbreaking dramas.

Tamara Rojo in Five Brahms Waltzes in the Manner of Isadora Duncan (The Royal Ballet)

Tamara Rojo dances the first two waltzes of Frederick Ashton's one-act ballet Five Brahms Waltzes in the Manner of Isadora Duncan, 2004. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/five-brahms-waltzes-in-the-manner-of-isadora-duncan-by-frederick-ashton Frederick Ashton saw Isadora Duncan dance in London in 1921. It was to be one of the most enduring influences on his life. Duncan's freedom of movement, the driven intensity of her dancing and the way in which she seemed to fuse music and dance, were all profound influences on Ashton's own choreographic style. Almost fifty years after seeing her perform, Ashton recalled, 'She had the most extraordinary quality of repose. She would stand for what seemed quite a long time doing nothing, and then make a very small gesture that seemed full of meaning'. Ashton originally choreographed a single waltz for Lynn Seymour, which had its premiere at a Hamburg gala on 22 June 1975 in memory of Vaslav Nijinsky (another choreographer strongly influenced by Duncan). The following year he expanded the piece to create a suite for Seymour, for a gala celebrating the 50th anniversary of Ballet Rambert – Marie Rambert, another admirer of Duncan, reputedly burst into tears on seeing Seymour so strongly embody one of her idols. Seymour never saw Duncan dance but was guided by the compendium of photos and line drawings that Ashton had collected. She later said of Duncan, 'She was a pioneer – she had a huge, strong self-belief. You don't see a lot of that today'.

Kenneth MacMillan's Manon short rehearsal - World Ballet Day 2014 (The Royal Ballet)

Royal Ballet Principals Marianela Nuñez and Federico Bonelli rehearse the final pas de deux from Kenneth MacMillan's Manon. You can see this rehearsal in full in our Manon Digital Programme: http://www.roh.org.uk/publications/manon-digital-programme Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/manon Kenneth MacMillan began work on Manon shortly after the birth of his only daughter. His source was the 18th-century French novel by Abbé Prévost, already adapted twice for opera by Massenet and Puccini. Renowned dance musician Leighton Lucas and his assistant Hilda Gaunt provided a score made from a patchwork of works by Massenet, including his famous yearning Elégie as the theme for the lovers. The premiere was given on 7 March 1974, the lead roles of Manon and Des Grieux danced by Antoinette Sibley and Anthony Dowell. The ballet quickly became a staple of The Royal Ballet's repertory. MacMillan found new sympathy with the capricious Manon, bringing his customary psychological insight and the memories of his own impoverished upbringing. He described his heroine as 'not so much afraid of being poor as ashamed of being poor'. Designs by MacMillan's friend Nicholas Georgiadis reflect this, depicting a world of lavish splendour polluted by miserable poverty. MacMillan's spectacular ensemble scenes for the whole Company create vivid, complex portraits of the distinct societies of Paris and New Orleans. But it is Manon and Des Grieux's impassioned pas de deux – recalling the intensity of MacMillan's earlier work, Romeo and Juliet – that drive this tragic story, and make Manon one of MacMillan's most heartbreaking dramas.

Kim Brandstrup's Leda and the Swan

Choreographer and director Kim Brandstrup's short dance film Leda and the Swan, commissioned by The Royal Ballet for Deloitte Ignite 2014. Performed by dancers Zenaida Yanowsky and Tommy Franzen, and Yeats’s poetry read by actor Fiona Shaw. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/about/deloitte-ignite The annual contemporary arts festival at the Royal Opera House. Deloitte Ignite 2014 was curated by The Royal Ballet and The National Gallery’s Minna Moore Ede, this year's festival is a feast of dance and visual art. The month-long festival celebrated and explored the origin of myth and creation through dance, visual art, film, music and movement. The festival focused on two archetypal myths: Prometheus, the Titan who creates man from clay and steals fire from the Gods, and Leda and the Swan, the mysterious conjunction of a mortal woman and the god Zeus, disguised as a swan.

Plácido Domingo - LIVE in conversation

Join us for an exclusive live event as one of the greatest figures in the world of music joins Music Director of The Royal Opera, Antonio Pappano in conversation. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk

Manon rehearsal trailer | The Royal Ballet

Kenneth MacMillan's acclaimed tragic ballet is a modern masterpiece. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/manon Kenneth MacMillan began work on Manon shortly after the birth of his only daughter. His source was the 18th-century French novel by Abbé Prévost, already adapted twice for opera by Massenet and Puccini. Renowned dance musician Leighton Lucas and his assistant Hilda Gaunt provided a score made from a patchwork of works by Massenet, including his famous yearning Elégie as the theme for the lovers. The premiere was given on 7 March 1974, the lead roles of Manon and Des Grieux danced by Antoinette Sibley and Anthony Dowell. The ballet quickly became a staple of The Royal Ballet's repertory. MacMillan found new sympathy with the capricious Manon, bringing his customary psychological insight and the memories of his own impoverished upbringing. He described his heroine as 'not so much afraid of being poor as ashamed of being poor'. Designs by MacMillan's friend Nicholas Georgiadis reflect this, depicting a world of lavish splendour polluted by miserable poverty. MacMillan's spectacular ensemble scenes for the whole Company create vivid, complex portraits of the distinct societies of Paris and New Orleans. But it is Manon and Des Grieux's impassioned pas de deux – recalling the intensity of MacMillan's earlier work, Romeo and Juliet – that drive this tragic story, and make Manon one of MacMillan's most heartbreaking dramas. Live in cinemas Thursday 16 October 2014. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/showings/manon-live-2014

#WorldBalletDay challenge: your pirouettes

Some of the pirouettes you posted via social media for World Ballet Day 2014. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/worldballetday World Ballet Day ran from 3am to 11pm (British Standard Time) on 1 October 2014, it was a day-long live stream from five of the world's leading ballet companies. The Royal Ballet joined The Australian Ballet, Bolshoi Ballet, The National Ballet of Canada and San Francisco Ballet to give you exclusive rehearsal footage, a chance to see how the different companies warm up for the day and interviews with choreographers and leading figures in the dance world.

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