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Royal Opera House

The Royal Opera House houses the UK’s leading Opera and Ballet companies, and plays host to a wide range of visiting companies and artists.  Through its programme on the main stage, in the Linbury Studio, the Clore Studio and in spaces throughout the building it presents many forms of classical and contemporary opera and dance. Our funding is a contribution towards its core costs.

Funding awards

  • 2012-2013: £25,208,100
  • 2013-2014: £25,787,886
  • 2014-2015: £26,430,076

Video feed

Culture Change Final Conference 2015 at the Royal Opera House

Professionals from the creative and cultural industries speak at the final Culture Change Conference 2015. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/culturechange Culture Change was a programme offering free business support to the creative and cultural industries, helping people save money and become more sustainable. The skills workshops and networking sessions helped people save money, create an environmental action plan, apply for future funding and discover new ways to grow their audience. The Culture Change programme was supported by the European Regional Development Fund.

La bohème trailer (The Royal Opera)

A lost key and an accidental touch of cold hands in the dark – so begins one of the great romances of all opera, told in vivid detail in this classic production. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/boheme La bohème had a lukewarm reception at its premiere in 1896, but its fortunes almost immediately changed. Giacomo Puccini's romantic depiction of bohemian Paris, with memorable music and a love story drawn from everyday life, has captivated audiences round the world, making La bohème one of the best-loved of all operas. It was first performed in Covent Garden in 1897 and has had more than 500 performances here since. John Copley's production 1974 production, with wonderfully detailed designs by Julia Trevelyan Oman, brings Paris of the 1830s to life – everything from the lively Latin Quarter, where hawkers and traders ply their wares, to a drafty attic where impoverished artists live hand-to-mouth. Rodolfo and Mimì's love story is given moving expression through Puccini's score, from their first meeting in Act I (a scene which contains some of the composer’s most exquisite arias and duets) to their poignant reunion in Act IV. These moments of emotional intensity are contrasted with the colourful spectacle of the Café Momus and surrounding streets in Act II, where Puccini presents a cross-section of Parisian society in all its noise and vibrancy.

In Conversation with Antonio Pappano, Music Director of The Royal Opera

The Royal Opera Music Director Antonio Pappano reflects on 12 years with The Royal Opera, getting to know the London audience and working with Plácido Domingo. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/news/watch-antonio-pappano-in-conversation-if-youre-the-musical-boss-of-the-house-you-have-to-stick-your-nose-into-all-corners-of-the-repertory Antonio Pappano has held the position of Music Director of The Royal Opera since 2002. During his tenure he has conducted an extensive repertory, including works by Mozart, Verdi, Wagner, Puccini, Richard Strauss, Ravel, Berg, Shostakovich and Britten, as well as the world premieres of Birtwistle’s The Minotaur (2008) and Turnage’s Anna Nicole (2011), and works for The Royal Ballet. http://www.roh.org.uk/people/antonio-pappano

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Royal Opera Season 2015/16 Trailer

The Royal Opera's 2015/16 Season has been announced. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/news/royal-opera-house-201516-season-announced The Royal Opera's Season will feature eight new productions on the Covent Garden main stage - Orphée et Eurydice by Hofesh Shechter and John Fulljames, Morgen und Abend by Graham Vick, Cavalleria rusticana / Pagliacci by Damiano Michieletto, L’Étoile by Mariame Clément, Boris Godunov by Richard Jones, Lucia di Lammermoor by Katie Mitchell, Oedipe by Àlex Ollé, and Il trovatore by David Bösch. Four of these directors are new to Covent Garden. Three world premieres will be performed – 4.48 Psychosis (based on playwright Sarah Kane's final play), Morgen und Abend, Pleasure - as well as two London premieres - The Last Hotel and In Parenthesis. The strand of programming inspired by the theme of Orpheus that began in January 2015 with Monteverdi's Orfeo at the Roundhouse continues with three productions inspired by the same myth – Gluck’s Orphée et Eurydice on the ROH main stage, Luigi Rossi’s Orpheus at the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse, and Little Bulb Theatre and Battersea Arts Centre on Tour’s Orpheus in the Linbury. Four Royal Opera productions will be staged at external venues - Gerald Barry's The Importance of Being Earnest at New York's Rose Theater and the Barbican in London; Keith Warner's aforementioned production of Luigi Rossi's Orpheus at the Sam Wanamaker Playhouse; and Mark Simpson's Pleasure and Philip Venables's 4.48 Psychosis, both at the Lyric Hammersmith. In some cases these relationships with other venues will enable us to stage pieces that would have been shown in the Linbury Studio Theatre during its period of closure for the Open Up project. Continuing the ROH's partnership with the BBC, BBC Radio 3 will broadcast 11 productions from the main stage over the course of the Season. Director of Music Antonio Pappano will conduct two new productions (Cavalleria rusticana / Pagliacci, Boris Godunov), a revival of Werther and a symphonic concert with the Orchestra of the Royal Opera House. He will also lead The Royal Opera on a previously-announced tour to Japan.

The Culture Debate - 5 political parties debate UK arts policy

A partnership between Creative Industries Federation and The Royal Opera House. Pre-election debate featuring Ed Vaizey (Conservative), Harriet Harman (Labour), Baroness Bonham-Carter (Liberal Democrat), Peter Whittle (UKIP) and Martin Dobson (The Green Party). The Culture Debate was chaired by Martha Kearney and featured Conservative Minister of State for Culture and the Digital Economy Ed Vaizey; Labour Shadow Secretary of State for Culture Media and Sport Harriet Harman; co-chair of the Liberal Democrat Party Committee on Culture Baroness Bonham-Carter; UKIP culture spokesperson Peter Whittle; and Green Party spokesperson for Culture, Media and Sport Martin Dobson. The event saw the panel debate their party's policies on the arts and creative industries in front of a live studio audience including leading figures from the sector.

Cubanía

Royal Ballet Guest Principal Dancer Carlos Acosta returns with his exciting mixed programme of dance inspired by his homeland. The show reunites him with Alexander Varona, Veronica Corveas – Principal Dancer of Ballet Nacional de Cuba – Miguel Altunaga, Royal Ballet Principal Dancer Zenaida Yanowsky, and the acclaimed Danza Contemporanea de Cuba, all of whom help create a diverse first half of modern dance. The evening finishes with the exuberant Tocororro Suite, which was reimagined for its performance at the Royal Opera House in summer 2014 and will once again feature live music from Carlos’s Cuban House Band. It will be an evening of dance to remember for all fans of Carlos Acosta. http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/cubania-by-carlos-acosta

Introduction to the Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny (The Royal Opera)

The cast and creative team introduce Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill's opera. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/mahagonny The three-year genesis of Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny (Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny) spanned the entire partnership between Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill – one of the most fruitful and shortest musical collaborations of the 20th century. The great success of their first work together, the Mahagonny Songspiel (1927), encouraged the two to adapt it into a full-length opera. But progress stalled as the two men discovered their theories were developing in deeply divergent directions: Brecht eager to pursue the disjointed effect of his theories of epic theatre, Weill looking for ways to unify very different styles of music. Concerns from first the publishers and then producers over the work's 'depravity' further increased the disruption. The riot at the opera's premiere on 9 March 1930 was the beginning of the end of Weill's career in Germany. The troubled development of Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny only adds to the work's extraordinary power as one of the most unsettling and provocative of all operas. This is Weill at his most brilliant and inventive, incorporating popular song in the 'Alabama Song' and neoclassicism in the terrifying 'Hurricane fugue'. The Royal Opera's Associate Director of Opera John Fulljames directs The Royal Opera’s first production of the work in collaboration with designer Es Devlin (Don Giovanni, Les Troyens). They focus on Brecht and Weill's stinging critique of consumerism while finding new relevance in our insatiable depletion of the earth's resources.

The set design in The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny (The Royal Opera)

Set designer Es Devlin and director John Fulljames take us through ideas for the production design in The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/mahagonny The three-year genesis of Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny (Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny) spanned the entire partnership between Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill – one of the most fruitful and shortest musical collaborations of the 20th century. The great success of their first work together, the Mahagonny Songspiel (1927), encouraged the two to adapt it into a full-length opera. But progress stalled as the two men discovered their theories were developing in deeply divergent directions: Brecht eager to pursue the disjointed effect of his theories of epic theatre, Weill looking for ways to unify very different styles of music. Concerns from first the publishers and then producers over the work's 'depravity' further increased the disruption. The riot at the opera's premiere on 9 March 1930 was the beginning of the end of Weill's career in Germany. The troubled development of Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny only adds to the work's extraordinary power as one of the most unsettling and provocative of all operas. This is Weill at his most brilliant and inventive, incorporating popular song in the 'Alabama Song' and neoclassicism in the terrifying 'Hurricane fugue'. The Royal Opera's Associate Director of Opera John Fulljames directs The Royal Opera’s first production of the work in collaboration with designer Es Devlin (Don Giovanni, Les Troyens). They focus on Brecht and Weill's stinging critique of consumerism while finding new relevance in our insatiable depletion of the earth's resources.

Exploring Kurt Weill's score for Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny (The Royal Opera)

The cast and creative team on Kurt Weill's music in The Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/mahagonny The three-year genesis of Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny (Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny) spanned the entire partnership between Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill – one of the most fruitful and shortest musical collaborations of the 20th century. The great success of their first work together, the Mahagonny Songspiel (1927), encouraged the two to adapt it into a full-length opera. But progress stalled as the two men discovered their theories were developing in deeply divergent directions: Brecht eager to pursue the disjointed effect of his theories of epic theatre, Weill looking for ways to unify very different styles of music. Concerns from first the publishers and then producers over the work's 'depravity' further increased the disruption. The riot at the opera's premiere on 9 March 1930 was the beginning of the end of Weill's career in Germany. The troubled development of Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny only adds to the work's extraordinary power as one of the most unsettling and provocative of all operas. This is Weill at his most brilliant and inventive, incorporating popular song in the 'Alabama Song' and neoclassicism in the terrifying 'Hurricane fugue'. The Royal Opera's Associate Director of Opera John Fulljames directs The Royal Opera’s first production of the work in collaboration with designer Es Devlin (Don Giovanni, Les Troyens). They focus on Brecht and Weill's stinging critique of consumerism while finding new relevance in our insatiable depletion of the earth's resources.

Król Roger trailer (The Royal Opera)

Kasper Holten presents a new production of Szymanowski's sumptuously scored opera King Roger, a meditation on identity and desire. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk Polish composer Karol Szymanowski began to gather ideas for Król Roger (King Roger), his second and final opera, in 1918. He was in part inspired by Euripides' The Bacchae, in which King Pentheus attempts to suppress the hedonistic worship of Bacchus but ultimately succumbs to his temptation and is destroyed in a bloody frenzy. Szymanowski's cousin, the poet Jaroslaw Iwaszkiewicz, provided the original libretto; but in Szymanowski's arduous six-year gestation of the piece he altered the third act. His King Roger instead becomes a Nietzschean hero, who resists his desire and emerges 'strong enough for freedom'. But the focus of the opera is Roger's agonizing indecision – and the glorious music of the Act II Bacchic dance leaves a profound impression of the power of sensual temptation. Szymanowski's music for the opera is opulently scored. The three short acts – commonly called the Byzantine, the Oriental and the Hellenic – brilliantly incorporate distinct musical styles. There are passages of exquisite lyricism, such as Roxana's soaring Act II aria, alongside thrilling writing for the chorus. Kasper Holten's new production (The Royal Opera's first) finds in Roger's indecision an expression of the struggle we all face – the struggle between intelligence and instinct in what is the innate duality of human nature. Music courtesy of Warner Music Inc: Available at https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/szymanowski-krol-roger/id693728331

King Size Interview (The Royal Opera | Theater Basel)

An interview with King Size dramaturg Malte Ubenauf, and performer Michael von der Heide, about their upcoming production King Size. A somnolent couple in a huge hotel bedroom sing songs ranging from Purcell to pop, in Christoph Marthaler's acclaimed reimagining of the Liederabend (‘evening of song’). Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/king-size-by-christoph-marthaler A couple are trying to sleep in an unfamiliar room, but they feel lost in the huge bed. As their dreams take over they console themselves through songs from Purcell to The Jackson 5 via Schumann and Michel Polnareff. Swiss director and composer Christoph Marthaler has long been at the forefront of European theatre. In King Size, first performed in Basel in 2013, he presents a hugely original take on the Liederabend. In Mathaler's hands this traditional 'evening of song' becomes a witty, charming and profound meditation on love and the seduction of dreams. At the heart of Marthaler's vision is the musical phenomenon of enharmonics – two notes that have different names but sound the same. Mathaler uses this idea not only to unite songs from across lyrical history but to explore self and other, dream and reality. Bendix Dethleffsen creates the score.

Song of the Earth in rehearsal (The Royal Ballet)

Laura Morera, Nehemiah Kish and Edward Watson rehearse Kenneth MacMillan's Song of the Earth with Monica Mason and Grant Coyle. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/song-of-the-earth-by-kenneth-macmillan Kenneth MacMillan first heard Gustav Mahler's Das Lied von der Erde in 1958. He immediately fell in love with Mahler's elegiac masterpiece and in 1959 asked if he could use the piece in a new commission for The Royal Ballet. But the ROH Board refused, concerned that such a major musical work was not suitable accompaniment for ballet. It wasn't until 1965 that MacMillan was able to create his Song of the Earth, for Stuttgart Ballet on the invitation of his friend John Cranko. The ballet was instantly acclaimed, recognized as MacMillan's arrival into full maturity as a choreographer. The Royal Ballet took the piece into their repertory only six months after its Stuttgart premiere. MacMillan introduced a narrative thread to the piece's six movements, drawing on imagery from Hans Bethge's free translation of the six T'ang-dynasty poems that Mahler used. Marcia Haydée created the role of the woman, a figure of loneliness isolated from the movements of the corps de ballet around her. The man was created by Ray Barra, and the Messenger of Death by Egon Madsen, then only 23 years old. In MacMillan's hands Death becomes not a figure of evil but a gentle, ever-present companion. Earthbound, non-classical movements morph seamlessly into modernist curves in a work of breathtaking beauty and power.

Frederick Ashton's The Fred Step in slow motion (The Royal Ballet)

Francesca Hayward, Soloist of The Royal Ballet performs Frederick Ashtons signature move; 'the Fred step'. ‘Arabesque, fondu, coupé, petit developpé, pas de bourée, pas de chat’. This sequence is the Fred Step – one of the most famous motifs in ballet. It takes its nickname from The Royal Ballet’s Founder Choreographer, Frederick Ashton, who included this enchaînement in almost all his ballets. Though it is known as his choreographic signature, Ashton himself often referred to the sequence as the ‘Pavlova’, acknowledging the prima ballerina from whom he borrowed it. Ashton had first seen Anna Pavlova perform in Peru - the land of his birth - when he was just 13, and later described how her performance inspired him: ‘She injected me with her poison and from the end of that evening I wanted to dance’. The Fred Step was originally part of a gavotte that Pavlova performed to ‘The Glow Worm’, part of an operetta by Paul Lincke. After Pavlova's death in 1931, Ashton – who thought of her ‘when I’m working all the time’ – came to regard it as his talisman. http://www.roh.org.uk/news/frederick-ashton-mixed-programme-dance-highlight-the-fred-step

La Traviata: Renée Fleming sings 'Sempre libera' (The Royal Opera)

Renée Fleming as Violetta Valéry sings Sempre Libera (Always Free) from Verdi's opera La traviata. Violeta debates whether she loves Alfredo (Joseph Calleja) - heard here offstage - but concludes she needs to be free. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/la-traviata-by-richard-eyre ‘A toast to the pleasures of life!’ – so sings Violetta, her new admirer Alfredo and her party guests in the opening scene of Giuseppe Verdi’s La traviata. But beneath the surface glamour of Violetta’s Parisian life run darker undercurrents: her doomed love for Alfredo and the tensions the lovers encounter when they break society’s conventions. La traviata, based on Alexandre Dumas fils’s play La Dame aux camélias, is one of Verdi’s most popular operas, combining drama, profound emotion and wonderful melodies. Richard Eyre’s classic production conveys the indulgent social whirl of 19th-century Paris. It provides a vivid setting for Verdi’s tuneful score, which includes such favourites as Violetta’s introspective ‘Ah fors’è lui’ and ecstatic ‘Sempre libera’; the duet ‘Pura siccome un angelo’ as Giorgio Germont begs Violetta to leave Alfredo; and ‘Parigi, o cara’, in which the lovers poignantly imagine a life that will never be theirs. The role of Violetta (the ‘fallen woman’ of the title) is one of Verdi’s most complex and enduring characters.

Iana Salenko and Steven McRae rehearse Swan Lake (The Royal Ballet)

Principal of The Royal Ballet, Steven McRae and Guest Artist, Iana Salenko rehearse Swan Lake. This film was shot and edited by First Soloist of The Royal Ballet, Andre Uspenski. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/swanlake http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/swan-lake-by-anthony-dowell Swan Lake was Pyotr Il’yich Tchaikovsky's first score for ballet. Its 1877 premiere was poorly received, but it has since become one of the most loved of all ballets. The twinned role of the radiant White Swan and the scheming, duplicitous Black Swan tests the full range of a ballerina's powers, particularly in the two great pas de deux of Acts II and III. Other highlights include the charming Dance of the Little Swans performed by a moonlit lake and sweeping ballroom waltzes in the splendour of the royal palace. Anthony Dowell's glorious interpretation uses classical choreography created by Lev Ivanov and Marius Petipa for the ballet's revised 1895 version. Dramatic costumes emphasize the contrast between human and spirit worlds, while glowing lanterns, shimmering fabrics and designs inspired by the work of Peter Carl Fabergé create a magical setting.

Anthony Dowell and Darcey Bussell discuss Swan Lake (The Royal Ballet)

Former Director of The Royal Ballet Anthony Dowell and Former Principal dancer Darcey Bussell discuss Dowell's production of Swan Lake. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/swanlake Swan Lake was Pyotr Il’yich Tchaikovsky's first score for ballet. Its 1877 premiere was poorly received, but it has since become one of the most loved of all ballets. The twinned role of the radiant White Swan and the scheming, duplicitous Black Swan tests the full range of a ballerina's powers, particularly in the two great pas de deux of Acts II and III. Other highlights include the charming Dance of the Little Swans performed by a moonlit lake and sweeping ballroom waltzes in the splendour of the royal palace. Anthony Dowell's glorious interpretation uses classical choreography created by Lev Ivanov and Marius Petipa for the ballet's revised 1895 version. Dramatic costumes emphasize the contrast between human and spirit worlds, while glowing lanterns, shimmering fabrics and designs inspired by the work of Peter Carl Fabergé create a magical setting.

Coaching the dancers of The Royal Ballet (The Royal Ballet)

A look at the role of a coach and how they prepare the dancers of The Royal Ballet to perform at the highest level. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/swanlake Swan Lake was Pyotr Il’yich Tchaikovsky's first score for ballet. Its 1877 premiere was poorly received, but it has since become one of the most loved of all ballets. The twinned role of the radiant White Swan and the scheming, duplicitous Black Swan tests the full range of a ballerina's powers, particularly in the two great pas de deux of Acts II and III. Other highlights include the charming Dance of the Little Swans performed by a moonlit lake and sweeping ballroom waltzes in the splendour of the royal palace. Anthony Dowell's glorious interpretation uses classical choreography created by Lev Ivanov and Marius Petipa for the ballet's revised 1895 version. Dramatic costumes emphasize the contrast between human and spirit worlds, while glowing lanterns, shimmering fabrics and designs inspired by the work of Peter Carl Fabergé create a magical setting.

Natalia Osipova, Matthew Golding and the corps de ballet on Swan Lake (The Royal Ballet)

A look at the roles of the principal dancers and the corps de ballet in The Royal Ballet's Swan Lake. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/swanlake Swan Lake was Pyotr Il’yich Tchaikovsky's first score for ballet. Its 1877 premiere was poorly received, but it has since become one of the most loved of all ballets. The twinned role of the radiant White Swan and the scheming, duplicitous Black Swan tests the full range of a ballerina's powers, particularly in the two great pas de deux of Acts II and III. Other highlights include the charming Dance of the Little Swans performed by a moonlit lake and sweeping ballroom waltzes in the splendour of the royal palace. Anthony Dowell's glorious interpretation uses classical choreography created by Lev Ivanov and Marius Petipa for the ballet's revised 1895 version. Dramatic costumes emphasize the contrast between human and spirit worlds, while glowing lanterns, shimmering fabrics and designs inspired by the work of Peter Carl Fabergé create a magical setting.

An introduction to the Youth Opera Company (The Royal Opera)

An insight into the Royal Opera House's youngest opera company. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/youthopera The Royal Opera House’s Youth Opera Company is a 50-strong group of diverse, talented children aged nine-to-13-years-old. Members come from across London and the South East and from a wide variety of backgrounds. What they have in common is real potential as singers and actors; potential that they discover and develop through being part of the Company.

Angel Blue sings Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill's 'Youkali' (The Royal Opera)

Angel Blue sings Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill's 'Youkali', accompanied by pianist James Baillieu. The performance was part of an Insights event in which novelist and journalist Will Self discussed the themes of the opera and challenged the purpose of the art form. The event was live-streamed online. http://www.roh.org.uk/news/watch-will-self-event-live-streamed-for-free-on-4-march-2015

Angel Blue sings Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill's 'Surabaya Johnny' (The Royal Opera)

Angel Blue sings Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill's 'Surabaya Johnny', accompanied by pianist James Baillieu. The performance was part of an Insights event in which novelist and journalist Will Self discussed the themes of the opera and challenged the purpose of the art form. The event was live-streamed online. http://www.roh.org.uk/news/watch-will-self-event-live-streamed-for-free-on-4-march-2015

Angel Blue sings 'Alabama Song' from Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny (The Royal Opera)

Angel Blue sings Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill's 'Alabama Song' from Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny, accompanied by pianist James Baillieu. The performance was part of an Insights event in which novelist and journalist Will Self discussed the themes of the opera and challenged the purpose of the art form. The event was live-streamed online. http://www.roh.org.uk/news/watch-will-self-event-live-streamed-for-free-on-4-march-2015 The 'Alabama Song' has inspired covers by artists including David Bowie and The Doors. Find out more: http://www.roh.org.uk/news/oh-show-us-the-way-to-the-next-whisky-bar John Fulljames's new production of Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny opens on 10 March 2015. http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/rise-and-fall-of-the-city-of-mahagonny-by-john-fulljames The three-year genesis of Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny (Rise and Fall of the City of Mahagonny) spanned the entire partnership between Bertolt Brecht and Kurt Weill – one of the most fruitful and shortest musical collaborations of the 20th century. The great success of their first work together, the Mahagonny Songspiel (1927), encouraged the two to adapt it into a full-length opera. But progress stalled as the two men discovered their theories were developing in deeply divergent directions: Brecht eager to pursue the disjointed effect of his theories of epic theatre, Weill looking for ways to unify very different styles of music. Concerns from first the publishers and then producers over the work's 'depravity' further increased the disruption. The riot at the opera's premiere on 9 March 1930 was the beginning of the end of Weill's career in Germany. The troubled development of Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny only adds to the work's extraordinary power as one of the most unsettling and provocative of all operas. This is Weill at his most brilliant and inventive, incorporating popular song in the 'Alabama Song' and neoclassicism in the terrifying 'Hurricane fugue'. The Royal Opera's Associate Director of Opera John Fulljames directs The Royal Opera’s first production of the work in collaboration with designer Es Devlin (Don Giovanni, Les Troyens). They focus on Brecht and Weill's stinging critique of consumerism while finding new relevance in our insatiable depletion of the earth's resources.

Opera Shorts: Screen Grab, inspired by Mozart's Die Zauberflöte

Screen Grab, by Riena Shibahara, Annaliei Sayers and Matthew Brooks, is one of a series of animated films inspired by opera and produced in collaboration with Kingston University students, 2015. The animation uses the idea of social media and online presence as a platform for a personality shift and an outlet for rage. The animation reveals the Queen of the Night’s real feelings, which have been disguised under her mask, in the same way that online interaction can be very different from face-to-face communication. http://www.roh.org.uk/news/new-animations-offer-fresh-take-on-classic-operatic-moments Mozart wrote Die Zauberflöte (The Magic Flute) for a suburban theatre in Vienna, the Theater auf der Wieden, and drew on the magical spectacle and earthy comedy of popular Viennese theatre. As well as being a comedy, Die Zauberflöte is an expression of Mozart’s profound spiritual beliefs. Enlightenment concerns with the search for wisdom and virtue are at the heart of this enchanting tale. Die Zauberflöte was an instant success with audiences and Mozart’s supposed rival Salieri described it as an ‘operone’ – a great opera. David McVicar’s classic production embraces both the seriousness and comedy of Mozart’s work. The audience is transported to a fantastical world of dancing animals, flying machines and dazzlingly starry skies. The setting provides a wonderful backdrop for Mozart’s kaleidoscopic score, from the Queen of the Night’s coloratura fireworks to Tamino and Pamina’s lyrical love duets and Papageno’s hearty, folksong-like arias. http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/die-zauberflote-by-david-mcvicar

Opera Shorts: Drivetime, inspired by Mozart's Die Zauberflöte

Drivetime with ROH FM, by Rachael Hare, Chester Holmes and Tommy Vad Flaaten, is one of a series of animated films inspired by opera and produced in collaboration with Kingston University students in 2015. A seemingly mundane argument can cause fierce emotions. In this animation, the dramatic Queen of the Night aria acts as a soundtrack for the parents’ power struggle in this comically theatrical short about a normal family’s car ride. Find out more at http://www.roh.org.uk/news/new-animations-offer-fresh-take-on-classic-operatic-moments Mozart wrote Die Zauberflöte (The Magic Flute) for a suburban theatre in Vienna, the Theater auf der Wieden, and drew on the magical spectacle and earthy comedy of popular Viennese theatre. As well as being a comedy, Die Zauberflöte is an expression of Mozart’s profound spiritual beliefs. Enlightenment concerns with the search for wisdom and virtue are at the heart of this enchanting tale. Die Zauberflöte was an instant success with audiences and Mozart’s supposed rival Salieri described it as an ‘operone’ – a great opera. David McVicar’s classic production embraces both the seriousness and comedy of Mozart’s work. The audience is transported to a fantastical world of dancing animals, flying machines and dazzlingly starry skies. The setting provides a wonderful backdrop for Mozart’s kaleidoscopic score, from the Queen of the Night’s coloratura fireworks to Tamino and Pamina’s lyrical love duets and Papageno’s hearty, folksong-like arias. http://www.roh.org.uk/productions/die-zauberflote-by-david-mcvicar

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