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Lighthouse Arts And Training Ltd

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Funding awards

  • 2012-2013: £120,000
  • 2013-2014: £120,000
  • 2014-2015: £120,000

Video feed

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Improving Reality 2013 - Holly Gramazio

Lighthouse's digital culture conference, Improving Reality, returned for a third year this September. Talks included tours through worlds that artists are growing rather than making, critical revelations of the systems and infrastructures that shape our world, and narratives of radical alternative futures. Holly Gramazio of Hide & Seek, presents Tiny Games, a series of small, participatory games placed across the city during the Brighton Digital Festival.

Improving Reality 2013 - Paula Le Dieu

Lighthouse's digital culture conference, Improving Reality, returned for a third year this September. Talks included tours through worlds that artists are growing rather than making, critical revelations of the systems and infrastructures that shape our world, and narratives of radical alternative futures. We are faced with a constant set of questions about our role in this new networked era. Do we simply continue as consumers or passive audiences as others shape our civic, cultural and economic lives? Or do we make the most of the affordances of the technology and par- ticipate? Paula will use her work over the last 15 years to illustrate models of open culture and will highlight some of the risks our exist- ing cultural institutions face as a new generation emerges expecting "quotable culture".

Improving Reality 2013: Speaker's Panel - Session Three.

Speaker's Panel with Farida Vis, Georgina Voss, Justin Pickard and Paula Le Dieu.

Improving Reality 2013 - Justin Pickard

Lighthouse's digital culture conference, Improving Reality, returned for a third year this September. Talks included tours through worlds that artists are growing rather than making, critical revelations of the systems and infrastructures that shape our world, and narratives of radical alternative futures. What does it take to leave a lasting dent in the world? With an eye to the next 10-15 years, Justin's talk will take a closer look at some current and ongoing attempts to "improve reality" on a global scale. Between the billionaire philanthropist and the subsistence farmer with access to a shared smartphone, who gets to decide what counts as 'improvement'? Is technology ever the answer? What kind of technology? Whose voices count? And what, if anything, can we usefully say about what happens next?

Improving Reality 2013 - Georgina Voss Final

Lighthouse's digital culture conference, Improving Reality, returned for a third year this September. Talks included tours through worlds that artists are growing rather than making, critical revelations of the systems and infrastructures that shape our world, and narratives of radical alternative futures. Georgina will ask whose reality gets to be improved, in a talk entitled 'Esoteric Content'. The British government may trumpet that 'Innovation is Great!' but the ways in which technologies come into being are shaped and skewed by powerful social and economic forces. This talk moves between the 'bacon-wrapped economy' of the Bay Area, the structure of venture capitalists' social networks, 'picking winners' in energy policy, and illegitimate hedonising technologies to explore which realities are being opened up and which will be shut down.

Improving Reality 2013 - Farida Vis

Lighthouse's digital culture conference, Improving Reality, returned for a third year this September. Talks included tours through worlds that artists are growing rather than making, critical revelations of the systems and infrastructures that shape our world, and narratives of radical alternative futures. What does the algorithm see? In this talk Farida will take a closer look at how algorithms position us. As the researchers Kitchin and Dodge have recently suggested, algorithms tend to make themselves visible when something breaks, through visible ruptures. Farida will examine one such recent rupture and consider the workings of algorithms as objects situated within a cultural political context -- made and designed by humans. Whilst invisible most of the time, such ruptures offer important opportunities to think about how they increasingly mediate our lives and realities.

Improving Reality 2013: Speaker's Panel - Session Two

Speaker's Panel with Tobias Revell, Paul Graham Raven, Maja Kuzmanovic and Alexandra Daisy Ginsberg. Moderated by Simon Ings.

Improving Reality 2013 - Alexandra Daisy Ginsberg

Lighthouse's digital culture conference, Improving Reality, returned for a third year this September. Talks included tours through worlds that artists are growing rather than making, critical revelations of the systems and infrastructures that shape our world, and narratives of radical alternative futures. We assume design will make things 'better', but what do we mean by better? Longer-lasting? Cheaper? Sustainable? Hi-tech? Whose 'better' ultimate shapes our common future? Now synthetic biology is attempting to transform biology -- and life with it -- into a design and engineering discipline, finding ways to ask these questions is as important as ever. Daisy will talk about her work within synthetic biology, asking: can we use design to shape our future, rather than perpetuate the present?

Improving Reality 2013 - Maja Kuzmanovic

Lighthouse's digital culture conference, Improving Reality, returned for a third year this September. Talks included tours through worlds that artists are growing rather than making, critical revelations of the systems and infrastructures that shape our world, and narratives of radical alternative futures. The process of reimagining requires being aware of what is, what has gone before and attempts to answer the tricky questions of "what if..." Maja will talk about how FoAM create real life labs to explore these questions using methods such as 'future pre-enactments' and alternate reality narratives, attempting to transform speculative fiction into embodied foresight. As the loops between imagination and reality can be either tightened or unwound, reimagining becomes a heuristic process of perpetually walking into a swarm of possible futures, immersing ourselves in what might be and finding ways to thrive in conditions of uncertainty.

Improving Reality 2013 - Paul Graham Raven

Lighthouse's digital culture conference, Improving Reality, returned for a third year this September. Talks included tours through worlds that artists are growing rather than making, critical revelations of the systems and infrastructures that shape our world, and narratives of radical alternative futures. Paul is going to talk about infrastructure, about what we mean (or think we mean) when we say that word, and about why infrastructure is not so much invisible as illegible: omnipresent, ubiquitous, but almost always Someone Else's Problem. He will compare the Someone Else's Problem problem to the "hypnosis of normality" which Anab Jain (designer at Superflux) suggests design fiction is intended to dispel. Paul proposes that the tools of design fiction and critical theory can, and should, be turned outward upon the complex, interdependent and surprisingly fragile metasystems on which our lived reality is utterly dependent.

Improving Reality 2013: Speaker's Discussion - Session One

A panel of discussion with Frank Swain, Timo Arnall and Keller Easterling. Moderated by Honor Harger.

Improving Reality 2013 - Frank Swain

Lighthouse's digital culture conference, Improving Reality, returned for a third year this September. Talks included tours through worlds that artists are growing rather than making, critical revelations of the systems and infrastructures that shape our world, and narratives of radical alternative futures. Cities have never been egalitarian spaces. Those who build them do so to manifest their ideals in steel and concrete. As a key space in which these conflicts play out, it is imperative our infrastructure is made visible. Maps have the power to do that, throwing a light on the city's secret motives. But maps can also be used to distort our image of the city, further concealing its agenda, defining and even limiting how we see the world. Frank will take us on a guided tour of how maps have helped shape our understandings of built infrastructure, and provided us with powerful tools and metaphors which define how we navigate our environment.

Improving Reality 2013 - Tom Armitage

Lighthouse's digital culture conference, Improving Reality, returned for a third year this September. Talks included tours through worlds that artists are growing rather than making, critical revelations of the systems and infrastructures that shape our world, and narratives of radical alternative futures. Tom Armitage is a technologist, writer and designer based in London. He makes tools, toys, and art out of hardware, software, and the network. He is the maker of Tower Bridge / Making Bridges Talk (2008), Spirits Melted Into Air (2012) and many other works. Until 2012, Tom was a designer at Hide&Seek. He has spoken on technology, design, and games at conferences around the world, including at last year's dConstruct in Brighton. Tom will be talking about The Literary Operator, a new project commissioned by Lighthouse, made in collaboration with the writer Jeff Noon, based on his writings for Twitter.

Improving Reality 2013 - Tobias Revell

Lighthouse's digital culture conference, Improving Reality, returned for a third year this September. Talks included tours through worlds that artists are growing rather than making, critical revelations of the systems and infrastructures that shape our world, and narratives of radical alternative futures. The world is in economic turmoil, in the midst of a new kind of reformation, and some of the most dramatic transformations are being seen in how people, product and labour are valued and exchanged in the digital world. Through the lens of his projects, including Mercenary Cubiclists and New Mumbai, Tobias will talk about his interest in the conflicts between capitalism and the digital and how various attempts at translating between them have resulted in unwanted side effects and unforeseen futures.

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Contact details

Lighthouse, 28
Kensington Street

Brighton
BN1 4AJ

50.825649, -0.13663

  • 50.825649 -0.13663

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