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Leeds Museums and Galleries

Leeds Museums and Galleries comprises nine attractions including: Abbey House Museum; the Discovery Centre; Kirkstall Abbey; Leeds City Museum; Leeds Industrial Museum; Lotherton Hall;Temple Newsam; Thwaite Mills Watermill; and Leeds Art Gallery. The gallery is in Leeds' cultural quarter and offers a rich variety of art from Leeds' impressive collections. It includes work by well-known artists from the region, such as Henry Moore, Barbara Hepworth, Atkinson Grimshaw and Jacob Kramer, as well as work by a range of contemporary artists including Paula Rego, Bridget Riley, Georgina Starr, Tony Cragg, Antony Gormley and Francis Bacon.

Funding awards

  • 2012-2013: £1,680,000
  • 2013-2014: £1,680,000
  • 2014-2015: £1,695,000

Video feed

Out of Africa Review film – Leeds City Museum

The Out of Africa displays ran from September 2008 to early January 2014 in the World View gallery at Leeds City Museum, and this film captures the look of the gallery and includes footage from two Leeds commentators. Oluseyi Ogunjobi, a Yoruba Leeds artist and musician, who has worked at the museum since its opening in 2008, plays the djembe drum and talks about his favourite Yoruba pieces in the displays. He is both a visual and performing artist, who specialises in painting textiles in both a traditional and contemporary way, and a student of theatre with a PhD from the University of Leeds on the Yoruba Egungun masquerade. Oluseyi looks at an Egungun mask and talks about the honouring of the ancestors and the mask performance. He also looks at a Yoruba ritual drum, with carvings of hunters, and one of his own batik art works, called the Face of the Mask, which he produced for his PhD installation. Dr Carl Hylton, Chairperson of Leeds West Indian Centre Charitable Trust, talks about the Leeds Bi-Centenerary Transformation project of 2007, whose leaflet features in the Diaspora case in the gallery. He also talks in front of the ‘Africa Now’ case about the recent death of Nelson Mandela, and the commemoration events that were organised in Leeds, including the Walk of Respect from the Mandela Gardens in the city centre to the Mandela Centre in Chapeltown on 14 December. He voices his concern about the closure of the Africa gallery (to allow for installation of the new Voices of Asia displays), and encourages the curator to continue the museum’s work with the African collections. Filmed by the Leeds Museums and Galleries World Cultures Curator, Antonia Lovelace, on 9 and 16 December 2013 and edited by Ollie Bostock of Digifish.tv. Still photography of the gallery displays by the curator, and of African objects in the Leeds Museums collections by Norman Taylor. Funded by Arts Council England and Leeds City Council.

Leeds Hindu Temple - A film for Voices of Asia at Leeds City Museum

Welcome to Leeds Hindu Temple on Alexander Road in the Hyde Park/Burley area of Leeds. The priest, Pandit Omresh Pandey, the chairman Niranjan Vakharia, and the secretary, Chiragi Solanki were filmed at Leeds Hindu Mandir on 9 January 2014, and are shown alongside film of the celebration of the festival of Holi on 16 March. The chairman sets the scene by describing immigration from South Asia to the UK in the 1950s, and why many Hindus came to Yorkshire to work in the textile mills, which had a high labour demand. At first people worshipped in their own homes, and then this temple was developed from the 1960s. A previous chair, Mr Shah, drove forward the plans to incorporate authentic Hindu architecture. The main priest, Pandit Omresh Pandey, has been here for 14 years. He conducts the aarti ceremony before the altars with the different deity figures, and talks about the core meanings of the Hindu faith. God is one but people believe in the many different faces of God. The conch shell is blown, and the deities are offered sound, light, fire, scent, water and food, all relating to the five basic elements of fire, wind, water, space and earth. Chiragi Solanki talks about her more personal relationship with the deity Lord Krishna, as a teacher and an embodimentof divine love. She also mentions the main festival celebrations of Navratri, Janmasthani, and Holi, speaking against the backdrop of the congregation celebrating Holi with its bonfire and playful throwing of coloured powder. Produced by Digifish.tv , for the Voices of Asia gallery at Leeds City Museum. Directed, filmed and edited by Paul Banks. Camera assistants Ollie Bostock and Tom Dunderdale. Voice-over by Seetal Gahir. Motion graphics by Mathew Clarke using artwork by Upasana Sonigra. Funded by Arts Council England and Leeds City Council.

Gold - A film for Voices of Asia at Leeds City Museum

The Harehills area of Leeds has many shops that sell pure gold jewellery. Mr Ashok Mason, a Goldsmith & Jewellers in Harehills, was filmed in his shop on 28 January 2014. He talks about his family business and the importance of 22 and 24 carat gold jewellery to the South Asian Communities. From the gift of a tiny bracelet to a new born baby, followed by more gifts at 2 and a half, 5 or 6 and 16 years age, gold jewellery is given by your nearest relatives and sponsors. The most elaborate sets are presented to engaged couples and brides. Gold jewellery carries messages of family support and relationship links, as well as acting as a reserve savings fund, should the owner need to cash them in, for funds during emergencies, or a major life-time purchase, such as a first house. Kerandeep Kaur Virdee, of South Asian Arts UK, treasures her wedding jewellery from 1986. She shows us some of the gold jewellery she was given by parents and other relatives for her engagement and wedding, and explains its importance and meaning to her. She chose the contrast of green enamel and gold because of its appearance in a recent Bollywood film. In this interview, recorded on 11 March 2014 she also discusses the possible re-use or transformation of this gold jewellery in the future for the wedding of her daughter. The film then concludes with Ashok Mason demonstrating a repair of a gold chain in his workshop, and confirming his love of his jewellery work, and the way his business serves the South Asian community. Produced by Digifish.tv for the Voices of Asia gallery at Leeds City Museum. Directed, filmed and edited by Paul Banks. Camera Assistant Ollie Bostock. Voice-over by Seetal Gahir. Motion graphics by Mathew Clarke using artwork by Upasana Sonigra. Funded by the Arts Council, England, and Leeds City Council..

Dancing Gods - A film for Voices of Asia at Leeds City Museum

Indian classical dance forms combine movement and story-telling. Stories, characters and emotions are told through hand gestures known as mudras, which also appear on traditional Hindu deity sculptures. Here the Bharatnatyam dancer, Dilrani Kaur, shows you the gestures, which are explained by Seetal Gahir, another dancer and dance teacher, so you can try them yourself. The gesture lessons are interleaved with images of the same mudras on deity figures in the Leeds Museums and Galleries collections. The gestures demonstrated are: Namaste, used for greeting others politely in Indian culture, where you put your hands together, sideways on at chest height, and then bow slightly. Katakamukaha, Rama hero of the Ramayana, fights with his bow and arrow to rescue Sita from the demon Ravanna. This gesture can imitate the holding of the arrow. It is combined with Shikara, where you roll the four fingers of your left hand in, and stick your thumb up, and use this to hold the bow firmly. Pataka is a simple hand gesture that can show Vishnu’s gesture of blessing. It involves holding both hands palm upwards, squashing all four fingers together and tucking your thumb in. Now bless down with hands in the front and on both sides. Krishna’s flute playing, Krishna’s flute playing, Krishna plays a key role in the Mahbharata epic, and is famous for his sweet flute playing. Combining Katakamukaha and another hand position you appear to play the flute like Krishna. Produced by Digifish.tv for the Voices of Asia gallery at Leeds City Museum. Filming on 5 March 2014 at York Studios. Directed, filmed and edited by Paul Banks. Camera assistant Ollie Bostock. Voice-over by Seetal Gahir. Motion graphics by Mathew Clarke with titles using artwork by Upasana Sonigra. Funded by Arts Council England and Leeds City Council.

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Bhangra Beat - A film for Voices of Asia at Leeds City Museum

Inder ‘Goldfinger’ Matharu, the famous drummer and musician, teaches us how to play Bhangra rythms on the dhol drum from India. He was filmed at the King’s Hall in Ilkley on 27 February 2014, and talks about the drum’s history, and the basic drumming technique, before putting the bhangra beat together in easy stages. The body of the dhol drum is made from mango tree wood and the thicker of the two membranes or skins is usually made of goat skin. The thick membrane makes the base note, and the thinner one a higher note. Two different sticks or beaters are used. The thin taper-like stick is called a tilli, and the thick wooden stick is called dagga. With the tilli on different parts of the thin membrane you make the Ta, Tin, Ti and Te sound. With the dagga you make the deeper enforcing Ga and Ge sounds. The first rhythm demonstrated is a count of 6 using the tilli, followed by 2 beats with the dagga. You have a go! Then Inder shows us a fast count of 3 using the tilli, followed by the 2 slow beats with the dagga. The two alternate to produce basic bhangra beat. Follow him to make the sound yourself. Bhangra is based on celebration and fun – this is how it’s done! Four dancers from the Trishool Dance Academy come on stage to perform with Inder. Produced by Digifish.tv for the Voices of Asia gallery at Leeds City Museum. Directed, filmed and edited by Paul Banks. Camera assistant Ollie Bostock. Motion graphics by Mathew Clarke with titles using artwork by Upasana Sonigra. Funded by Arts Council England and Leeds City Council.

Welcome to Leeds Museums and Galleries YouTube channel

Our YouTube channel showcases some our recent work with collections and communities in Leeds. If you would like to get involved too, check out our website.

Flexible sandstone

A strange rock that flexes due to voids and interlocking quartz within it.

Tour D'art 2014

A short film made as part of the Yorkshire Sculpture Triangle’s activities for Le Grand Depart 2014. Inspired two artworks by artist Thomas Houseago on display in Leeds and Wakefield, Leeds Art Gallery, the Hepworth Wakefield, Yorkshire Sculpture Park and the Henry Moore Institute facilitated creative activities to inspire our local families to visit and enjoy thinking, making and talking about art. Leeds Art Gallery’s project worked with three schools – Beeston Primary, New Bewerley Primary and Stanningley Primary - and artists Emma Spencer, Chris Harman and photographer David Lindsay. The film was first screened in Leeds’ Millennium Square as part of the project celebration on 12 July, it was then taken into our schools and used in Assemblies to value the experiences that everyone had had as part of their ‘tour d’Art’. Commissioned by the Yorkshire Sculpture Triangle and made by photographer David Lindsay. Film content was gathered as stills photography during visits to Leeds Art Gallery, the Hepworth Wakefield or the Yorkshire Sculpture Park and collaged alongside footage of evaluatory sessions led by their coordinators Emma Spencer and Clare Price as a record of the project. Copyright info Yorkshire Sculpture Triangle alongside photographer David Lindsay, contact the Education Office at Leeds Art Gallery.

Look Into My World

The Look Into My World exhibition explored a wide variety of themes, led by the young people's questions and ideas, from searching for the souls of dead animals to exploring identity and challenging stereotypes. A range of skills and techniques has been used from printmaking and painting to sculpture, film and installation. The Look Into My World project began in September 2013, when young people aged 7 to 17 from six primary schools and four secondary schools, enjoyed a special visit to Leeds City Museum and Leeds Art Gallery. Young people explored an exhibition at Leeds City Museum of work by international author and illustrator Anthony Browne and were inspired by the humorous and serious stories he portrayed. At the Art Gallery they investigated contemporary art and the way that artists work, they also experienced making sculptures together in groups. The film tracks the progress of the project from visits to artworks. Workshops in schools led by artists Kate Genever and Lou Sumray further developed imaginative ways of working. Young people were supported by their teachers and the artists to express their own ideas. Finished work was selected for both this exhibition and for 'Satellite' exhibitions close to each school, including at a doctor's surgery and a professional gallery in a local mill. Young people have increased their confidence and creativity through their participation in this project and the artwork they have made. The teachers involved have also had the opportunity to develop new approaches in their classrooms. Participating primary schools: Allerton CE, Alwoodley, Holy Family, Ireland Wood, Pudsey Primrose, Stanningley Participating secondary schools: Benton Park, Brigshaw, Crawshaw, Guiseley Photography and film production: David Lindsay Project partners: Leeds Art Gallery, Leeds City Museum, ArtForms Arts Development, Studio 12, Leeds College of Art, Child Friendly Leeds and Arts Council England

Leeds Children's Day Marching Song - FLOREAT, LOIDIS!

The performers are the Bramley Elderly Action Singing Group performing in the Community Gallery at Abbey House Museum on 25th March 2014. The song is "Leeds Children's Day Marching Song - FLOREAT, LOIDIS!", written and composed by J. Harley Stones, Saville Green Council School, Leeds about 1930.

Inner workings of the Harrison precision-pendulum clock no. 2

Inner workings of the Harrison precision-pendulum clock no. 2. Filmed by Ian Fraser, Conservator, for Leeds Museums & Galleries

Harrison precision-pendulum clock no. 2

Matthew Read, Clocks Programme Tutor at West Dean College, getting the Harrison precision-pendulum clock no. 2 working during a visit to Leeds Museum Discovery Centre in October 2010. Filmed by Ian Fraser, Conservator, for Leeds Museums & Galleries

All the bells...

Kitty Ross, Curator of Social History, stands outside Abbey House Museum on the morning of 27th July 2012 ringing servants' bells and a cowbell as part of Martin Creed's Work No. 1197, to celebrate the start of the London 2012 Olympics. Filmed by Assistant Curator of Social History, Nicola Pullan, for Leeds Museums & Galleries

The Yorkshire Exhibition

We all know that Yorkshire is the biggest (and may we add, the best) county in England. Famous for its beautiful green space and sprawling landscapes it is also home to the longest steam operated railway in the UK and oldest working railway in the world, Britain's highest pub and the oldest registered visitor attraction in the country. To celebrate this Abbey House Museum will be opening a fantastic new exhibition on 25th January 2014 all about Yorkshire and the people who live, work and holiday here today. With inspiration taken from responses to our Yorkshire Survey and including the winning photographs from our "Snapshot of Yorkshire" competition the display will also feature iconic and quirky Yorkshire items from the Leeds collections. The exhibition will open on Saturday 25th January 2014 and run until 31st December 2014.​ This film was created in partnership with the Yorkshire Film Archive.

Volunteering with Leeds Museums and Galleries

What's it like volunteering with Leeds Museums and Galleries? Some of our textiles and conservation volunteers share their experiences and tell us what they love about volunteering. The background music in this clip is Joyful and Ceremonial by Paul Martin Pritchard.

Firestarters London 2012 - Yvonne Crowther

This set of films were created to capture some of the London 2012 Olympics & Paralympics Torch Relay in Leeds, by celebrating eight participants achievements and the stories of how they became torchbearers. The film was intended to complemented the 'In The Zone: Leeds Women in Sport 2012' film done the year before and supported a series of contemporary object acquisitions on London 2012. The film was shown in the Leeds Arena Summer 2013. With thanks to Simon Buckden, Sarah Freeman, Simon Brown, Yvonne Crowther, Maureen Brewer, George Stocker, Francis Edwards and Mike Healey. Filmed by Digifish

Firestarters London 2012 - Simon Buckden

This set of films were created to capture some of the London 2012 Olympics & Paralympics Torch Relay in Leeds, by celebrating eight participants achievements and the stories of how they became torchbearers. The film was intended to complemented the 'In The Zone: Leeds Women in Sport 2012' film done the year before and supported a series of contemporary object acquisitions on London 2012. The film was shown in the Leeds Arena Summer 2013. With thanks to Simon Buckden, Sarah Freeman, Simon Brown, Yvonne Crowther, Maureen Brewer, George Stocker, Francis Edwards and Mike Healey. Filmed by Digifish

Firestarters London 2012 - Simon Brown

This set of films were created to capture some of the London 2012 Olympics & Paralympics Torch Relay in Leeds, by celebrating eight participants achievements and the stories of how they became torchbearers. The film was intended to complemented the 'In The Zone: Leeds Women in Sport 2012' film done the year before and supported a series of contemporary object acquisitions on London 2012. The film was shown in the Leeds Arena Summer 2013. With thanks to Simon Buckden, Sarah Freeman, Simon Brown, Yvonne Crowther, Maureen Brewer, George Stocker, Francis Edwards and Mike Healey. Filmed by Digifish

Firestarters London 2012 - Sarah Freeman

This set of films were created to capture some of the London 2012 Olympics & Paralympics Torch Relay in Leeds, by celebrating eight participants achievements and the stories of how they became torchbearers. The film was intended to complemented the 'In The Zone: Leeds Women in Sport 2012' film done the year before and supported a series of contemporary object acquisitions on London 2012. The film was shown in the Leeds Arena Summer 2013. With thanks to Simon Buckden, Sarah Freeman, Simon Brown, Yvonne Crowther, Maureen Brewer, George Stocker, Francis Edwards and Mike Healey. Filmed by Digifish

Firestarters London 2012 - Mike Healey

This set of films were created to capture some of the London 2012 Olympics & Paralympics Torch Relay in Leeds, by celebrating eight participants achievements and the stories of how they became torchbearers. The film was intended to complemented the 'In The Zone: Leeds Women in Sport 2012' film done the year before and supported a series of contemporary object acquisitions on London 2012. The film was shown in the Leeds Arena Summer 2013. With thanks to Simon Buckden, Sarah Freeman, Simon Brown, Yvonne Crowther, Maureen Brewer, George Stocker, Francis Edwards and Mike Healey. Filmed by Digifish

Firestarters London 2012 - Maureen Brewer

This set of films were created to capture some of the London 2012 Olympics & Paralympics Torch Relay in Leeds, by celebrating eight participants achievements and the stories of how they became torchbearers. The film was intended to complemented the 'In The Zone: Leeds Women in Sport 2012' film done the year before and supported a series of contemporary object acquisitions on London 2012. The film was shown in the Leeds Arena Summer 2013. With thanks to Simon Buckden, Sarah Freeman, Simon Brown, Yvonne Crowther, Maureen Brewer, George Stocker, Francis Edwards and Mike Healey. Filmed by Digifish

Firestarters London 2012 - George Stocker

This set of films were created to capture some of the London 2012 Olympics & Paralympics Torch Relay in Leeds, by celebrating eight participants achievements and the stories of how they became torchbearers. The film was intended to complemented the 'In The Zone: Leeds Women in Sport 2012' film done the year before and supported a series of contemporary object acquisitions on London 2012. The film was shown in the Leeds Arena Summer 2013. With thanks to Simon Buckden, Sarah Freeman, Simon Brown, Yvonne Crowther, Maureen Brewer, George Stocker, Francis Edwards and Mike Healey. Filmed by Digifish

Firestarters London 2012 - Francis Edwards

This set of films were created to capture some of the London 2012 Olympics & Paralympics Torch Relay in Leeds, by celebrating eight participants achievements and the stories of how they became torchbearers. The film was intended to complemented the 'In The Zone: Leeds Women in Sport 2012' film done the year before and supported a series of contemporary object acquisitions on London 2012. The film was shown in the Leeds Arena Summer 2013. With thanks to Simon Buckden, Sarah Freeman, Simon Brown, Yvonne Crowther, Maureen Brewer, George Stocker, Francis Edwards and Mike Healey. Filmed by Digifish

Sushi

Takaaki Goto, a student at the University of Leeds, prepares Sushi and talks about the popularity of Sushi and the meaning of fish in Japanese culture. Estelle is a student from Taiwan who is studying at the University of Leeds on the MA in Art Gallery and Museum Studies course. She has made these three short films as part of her placement with Leeds Museums and Galleries. She got her friends from the University of Leeds Intercultural Ambassadors group to taste Bubble Tea from Taiwan and give their opinions on film. She was also filmed cooking Sweet Sour Fish herself, and filmed her friend Takaaki Goto making Sushi.

Sweet Sour Fish

Sweet Sour fish is fried fish with vegetables and a sauce which is popular in Taiwan, especially at New Year. Watch Estelle cook this dish and talk about the meaning of fish in Taiwan art and culture. Estelle is a student from Taiwan who is studying at the University of Leeds on the MA in Art Gallery and Museum Studies course. She has made these three short films as part of her placement with Leeds Museums and Galleries. She got her friends from the University of Leeds Intercultural Ambassadors group to taste Bubble Tea from Taiwan and give their opinions on film. She was also filmed cooking Sweet Sour Fish herself, and filmed her friend Takaaki Goto making Sushi.

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Contact details

www.leeds.gov.uk/museumsandgalleries

Leeds Museum Discovery Centre
Carlisle Road
Leeds
LS10 1LB

53.788399, -1.52953

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