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Faber and Faber Ltd

Faber and Faber was founded in 1929 and is one of the UK’s leading independent publishing houses. The firm boasts a historic catalogue featuring 12 Nobel Laureates, six Booker Prize-winners and some of the foremost literary figures of the twentieth century.

Faber has never been cowed by the ultramodern: under the direction of TS Elliot, works of poetry, biography, art and architecture monographs, essays and avant-garde ecology featured prominently; and this pioneering spirit is evident today in new ventures such as Fiber Finds, Faber Digital, the Faber Academy and the Faber Factory brand.

Funding awards

  • 2012-2013: £40,000
  • 2013-2014: £40,000
  • 2014-2015: £40,000

Video feed

Jenny Uglow on Britain's home front during the Napoleonic Wars

Jenny Uglow is the acclaimed author of many great works of history. Her new book, In These Times, tells the story of what happened in Britain during the Napoleonic wars. In this video she talks about her inspiration, and some of the many remarkable stories she uncovered along the way. We know the thrilling, terrible stories of the battles of the Napoleonic wars - but what of those left behind? The people on a Norfolk farm, in a Yorkshire mill, a Welsh iron foundry, an Irish village, a London bank or a Scottish mountain? The aristocrats and paupers, old and young, butchers and bakers and candlestick makers - how did the war touch their lives? Jenny Uglow, the prize-winning author of The Lunar Men and Nature's Engraver, follows the gripping back-and-forth of the first global war, but turns the news upside down, seeing how it reached the people. Illustrated by the satires of Gillray, Rowlandson and the paintings of Turner and Constable, and combining the familiar voices of Jane Austen, Wordsworth, Scott and Byron with others lost in the crowd, In These Times delves into the archives to tell the moving story of how people lived and loved and sang and wrote, struggling through hard times and opening new horizons that would change their country for a century ahead.

Historian Helen Castor reveals the real Joan of Arc

In her new book, acclaimed historian and BBC broadcaster Helen Castor, author of She-Wolves, brings us afresh a gripping life of Joan of Arc. Instead of the icon, she gives us a living, breathing young woman; a roaring girl fighting the English, and taking sides in a bloody civil war that was tearing fifteenth century France apart. In this interview she describes how she came to write the book, and what it was like to de-mythologise the great icon. The book is a portrait of a 19-year-old peasant who hears voices from God; a teenager transformed into a warrior leading an army to victory, in an age that believed women should not fight. And it is also the story behind the myth we all know, a myth which began to take hold at her trial: that of the Maid of Orleans, the saviour of France, a young woman burned at the stake as a heretic, a woman who five hundred years later would be declared a saint. Joan and her world are brought vividly to life in this refreshing new take on the medieval world.

Terry Coleman on The Old Vic

In his new book former Guardian Arts Correspondent and Olivier biographer Terry Coleman guides us through almost 200 years of performances and upheavals at one of the world's greatest theatres - London's Old Vic. It's a book full of impresarios and legendary actors - everyone from John Gielgud, Charles Laughton, Peggy Ashcroft and Laurence Olivier, to the man about to hand over the reins of the theatre, Kevin Spacey.

Peter Carey on Amnesia

What is the 'Angel Worm'? Double Booker Prize-winner Peter Carey talks us through his new novel Amnesia - set in a world of hacktivism and cyber terrorism - in this short video interview filmed in October 2014.

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Alex Preston talks about his new novel, In Love and War

A tale of love, heroism and resistance set against the stunning backdrop of 1930s Florence, In Love and War weaves fact and fiction to create a thrilling portrait of a man swept up in the chaos of war. Desperate to prove himself to his politician father, Esmond Lowndes is sent to Italy to forge ties between the British Union of Fascists and Mussolini's government. He is also escaping the disgrace of a scandalous love affair. In Florence, he discovers art and passion amongst eccentric expatriates and glamorous locals. But with the coming of war, he leaves his past behind and joins the Florentine resistance. He falls in love with a fellow freedom fighter and together they take on the malevolent Mario Carità, head of the Fascist secret police. Esmond is at the centre of assassination plots, shoot-outs and car chases, culminating in a final mission of extraordinary daring. A novel of art and letters, of bawdy raconteurs and dashing spies, In Love and War takes you deep into the hidden heart of history. It is a tale both epic and intimate, harrowing and life-affirming.

Dan Jones introduces The Hollow Crown

With The Hollow Crown bestselling author Dan Jones completes his epic history of medieval England with a new book about the Wars of the Roses - and describes how the Plantagenets tore themselves apart and were finally replaced by the Tudors. Here's a short interview with the author ahead of a more in-depth conversation which you'll find on the Faber & Faber website.

The Buried Giant from Kazuo Ishiguro - coming March 2015

An extraordinary new novel from the author of Never Let Me Go and the Booker Prize-winning The Remains of the Day. The Buried Giant begins as a couple set off across a troubled land of mist and rain in the hope of finding a son they have not seen in years. Sometimes savage, often intensely moving, Kazuo Ishiguro's first novel in a decade is about lost memories, love, revenge and war. http://theburiedgiant.com 'There's a journey we must go on and no more delay . . . '

John Lanchester explains 'Plog' from How to Speak Money

'Amortisation', 'Bear Market', 'Hot Waitress Index', 'Zombie Bank' ... terms we hear associated with the world of finance, but what do they all mean? If, as Will Self said, John Lanchester's bestselling 'Whoops!' provided a routemap to the crazed world of contemporary finance, Lanchester's new book - 'How to Speak Money' - is the jargon-busting phrasebook. It shows you it's possible to learn to speak the language of money. Possible, desirable and perhaps even necessary if we're to avoid feelings of complete helplessness and bafflement when confronted with the big financial forces that shape our lives.

John Lanchester explains 'Moral Hazard' from How to Speak Money

'Amortisation', 'Bear Market', 'Hot Waitress Index', 'Zombie Bank' ... terms we hear associated with the world of finance, but what do they all mean? If, as Will Self said, John Lanchester's bestselling 'Whoops!' provided a routemap to the crazed world of contemporary finance, Lanchester's new book - 'How to Speak Money' - is the jargon-busting phrasebook. It shows you it's possible to learn to speak the language of money. Possible, desirable and perhaps even necessary if we're to avoid feelings of complete helplessness and bafflement when confronted with the big financial forces that shape our lives.

John Lanchester explains 'Haircut' from How to Speak Money

'Amortisation', 'Bear Market', 'Hot Waitress Index', 'Zombie Bank' ... terms we hear associated with the world of finance, but what do they all mean? If, as Will Self said, John Lanchester's bestselling 'Whoops!' provided a routemap to the crazed world of contemporary finance, Lanchester's new book - 'How to Speak Money' - is the jargon-busting phrasebook. It shows you it's possible to learn to speak the language of money. Possible, desirable and perhaps even necessary if we're to avoid feelings of complete helplessness and bafflement when confronted with the big financial forces that shape our lives.

John Lanchester explains 'Austerity' from How to Speak Money

'Amortisation', 'Bear Market', 'Hot Waitress Index', 'Zombie Bank' ... terms we hear associated with the world of finance, but what do they all mean? If, as Will Self said, John Lanchester's bestselling 'Whoops!' provided a routemap to the crazed world of contemporary finance, Lanchester's new book - 'How to Speak Money' - is the jargon-busting phrasebook. It shows you it's possible to learn to speak the language of money. Possible, desirable and perhaps even necessary if we're to avoid feelings of complete helplessness and bafflement when confronted with the big financial forces that shape our lives.

John Lanchester explains How to Speak Money

Will Self called John Lanchester's previous book on money and banking - the bestselling 'Whoops!' - as 'the routemap to the crazed world of contemporary finance we've all been waiting for'. If 'Whoops!' was the routemap, then his new book 'How to Speak Money' is the phrasebook. It shows you that it's possible to learn to speak the language of money. Possible, desirable and perhaps even necessary if we're to avoid feelings of complete helplessness and bafflement when confronted with the big financial forces that shape our lives.

Adventures with the Wife in Space: living with Doctor Who

Neil Perryman loves Sue. He also loves Doctor Who. But can he bring his two great loves together? And does he have the right? Neil's ambitious (and some would say, foolhardy) experiment to get his wife Sue to watch every episode of Doctor Who from the beginning led to the hugely popular and hilarious blog, wifeinspace.com, and now the book Adventures with the Wife in Space, acclaimed by Steven Moffat: "Marriage, the TARDIS and this book - everything that's bigger on the inside."

Squishy McFluff Supermarket Sweep

Meet Squishy McFluff, the invisible cat! You'll have to try hard but you might see him if you imagine enough. This version has a surprise new ending...

Gerard Lyons on The Consolations of Economics

'The best new book for that post-lunch siesta,' reckons Boris Johnson. 'A blast of Anglo-Saxon commonsense after the maunderings of French gloomadon popper Thomas Piketty.' The future's bright and the economy is NOT in bad shape, according to the Chief Economic Advisor to the Mayor of London, Gerard Lyons. From his perch at City Hall, he tells us exactly why and also where we might be heading as he introduces his new book The Consolations of Economics.

Roderick Bailey tells us about Target: Italy

Roderick Bailey was able to draw on long-classified documents for his dazzling recreation of the cloak-and-dagger war fought by British secret agents in the Special Operations Executive (SOE) against Mussolini's Fascist Italy during the Second World War, which climaxed in one of the most extraordinary episodes of the whole conflict. Here is Roderick telling us more of what to expect in Target: Italy.

Viv Albertine on 'Clothes, Clothes, Clothes. Music, Music, Music. Boys, Boys, Boys.'

In 1970, Viv Albertine knew she wanted to be in a band, but had never seen a woman play electric guitar. Seven years later, she was the guitarist in the hugely influential all-female punk band, the Slits. This is the story of how, through sheer will, talent and fearlessness, she forced herself on to a male-dominated music scene and became part of a movement that changed music. Everything is here, unvarnished and unwashed: art school, squatting, hanging out in Sex with Vivienne Westwood and Malcolm McLaren, spending a day chained to Sid Vicious, on tour with The Clash, and being part of a brilliant, pioneering group of women making musical history. The result is a raw, thrilling story of life on the frontiers, and a candid account of what happened post-punk, taking in a career in film, IVF, illness, divorce - and making music again, twenty-five years later. This is a truly remarkable memoir, told in Viv's frank, irreverent and distinctive voice. Utterly shocking, very funny and ruthlessly honest, it is the story of a life lived unscripted, told from the heart. Buy the book from Faber: http://bit.ly/OE0qul Amazon: http://amzn.to/1h6nQ2Y Follow us @FaberSocial | @viv_albertine

Exploring The Moor with William Atkins

'The Moor: Lives, Landscape, Literature' is a book by William Atkins published by Faber and Faber. Blake Morrison called it 'an ambitious mix of history, topography, literary criticism and nature writing, in the tradition of WG Sebald, Robert MacFarlane and Olivia Laing' (Guardian Book of the Week) and John Carey said 'it is [Atkins'] ability to cheat expectation that gives him impact as a writer . . . [a] remarkable book.' (Sunday Times). Video production: Simon Warner. Score: Richard Skelton. Field Recording: Chris Watson.

Macavity: The Mystery Cat by T.S. Eliot. Read by Count Arthur Strong.

Count Arthur Strong reads Macavity: The Mystery Cat by T.S. Eliot. The most famous master criminal cat of them all is brought to life in this new edition with illustrations by Arthur Robins.

Akhil Sharma: Family Life

Akhil Sharma was born in New Delhi and emigrated to the US in the late 1970s. Having initially pursued a career in investment banking he came to prominence as a writer in 2001 with his debut novel, An Obedient Father, which won the Hemingway/PEN Award. In 2007 he was named as one of Granta's Best of Young American Novelists. So expectations for what Akhil would do next have been high for some time. Family Life, mirroring events in Akhil's own life - Akhil's brother suffered a severe head injury which left him brain-damaged - has been a dozen years in the writing, and has undergone many drafts and considerable pruning. But it's now with us and being rapturously received on both sides of the Atlantic.

Eimear McBride talks about A Girl is a Half-formed Thing

http://www.amazon.co.uk/A-Girl-Is-Half-formed-Thing/dp/0571317162/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1399566780&sr=8-1&keywords=a+girl+is+a+half+formed - WINNER OF THE BAILEYS WOMEN'S PRIZE FOR FICTION Eimear McBride's debut tells, with astonishing insight and in brutal detail, the story of a young woman's relationship with her brother, and the long shadow cast by his childhood brain tumour. Not so much a stream of consciousness, as an unconscious railing against a life that makes little sense, and a shocking and intimate insight into the thoughts, feelings and chaotic sexuality of a vulnerable and isolated protagonist, to read A Girl Is A Half-Formed Thing is to plunge inside its narrator's head, experiencing her world first-hand. This isn't always comfortable - but it is always a revelation. Touching on everything from family violence to sexuality and the personal struggle to remain intact in times of intense trauma, McBride writes with singular intensity, acute sensitivity and mordant wit. A Girl is a Half-formed Thing is moving, funny - and alarming. It is a book you will never forget. Winner of the inaugural Goldsmiths Prize, shortlisted for the Folio Prize , the Bailey's Women's Prize for Fiction, the Kerry Group Irish Novel of the Year Award, and longlisted for the Desmond Elliot Prize.

Eimear McBride reads from A Girl is Half-formed Thing

http://www.amazon.co.uk/A-Girl-Is-Half-formed-Thing/dp/0571317162/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1399566780&sr=8-1&keywords=a+girl+is+a+half+formed - WINNER OF THE BAILEY'S WOMEN'S PRIZE FOR FICTION Eimear McBride's debut tells, with astonishing insight and in brutal detail, the story of a young woman's relationship with her brother, and the long shadow cast by his childhood brain tumour. Not so much a stream of consciousness, as an unconscious railing against a life that makes little sense, and a shocking and intimate insight into the thoughts, feelings and chaotic sexuality of a vulnerable and isolated protagonist, to read A Girl Is A Half-Formed Thing is to plunge inside its narrator's head, experiencing her world first-hand. This isn't always comfortable - but it is always a revelation. Touching on everything from family violence to sexuality and the personal struggle to remain intact in times of intense trauma, McBride writes with singular intensity, acute sensitivity and mordant wit. A Girl is a Half-formed Thing is moving, funny - and alarming. It is a book you will never forget. Winner of the inaugural Goldsmiths Prize, shortlisted for the Folio Prize , the Bailey's Women's Prize for Fiction, the Kerry Group Irish Novel of the Year Award, and longlisted for the Desmond Elliot Prize.

Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea

Trailer for 'Between the Devil and the Deep Blue Sea' by April Genevieve Tucholke, published by Faber and Faber. You stop fearing the devil when you're holding his hand. Violet's grandmother always warned her about the Devil, but she never said he could be a sexy, dark-haired boy named River. A boy who kisses Violet in a cemetery by the sea . . . and makes her want to kiss him back. But Violet's already so in love, she can't see the truth. And that's just how River likes it. A dreamy, twisting contemporary romance, as gorgeously told as it is terrifying.

The new novel from Chris Ewan - Dead Line

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Dead-Line-Chris-Ewan/dp/0571287980/ref=sr_1_1_bnp_1_pap?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1396534432&sr=1-1&keywords=dead+line What do you do if your fiancée goes missing, presumed taken? If you're Daniel Trent, a highly trained specialist in hostage negotiation, the answer is simple: you find out who took her and you make them talk. But matters are complicated when Daniel's chief suspect is kidnapped. How does he get him back quickly - and alive? Set in Marseilles, Dead Line is a fast-paced thriller that pitches the reader into Daniel's world, as he tries desperately to secure the release of Jérôme Moreau from a ruthless gang in order to interrogate him on the whereabouts of his fiancée, Aimée. When things don't go according to plan, Daniel must use all his skills and instincts to find the answers he's looking for. But will he meet the deadline?

Alexia Casale on her mysterious new novel The Bone Dragon

A blend of psychological thriller and fairytale,The Bone Dragon explores the fragile boundaries between real life and fantasy, and the darkest corners of the human mind. Here writer Alexia Casale takes us into the dark world of The Bone Dragon. Shortlisted for the Waterstones Children's Book Prize 2014

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