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Funding awards

  • 2012-2013: £120,000
  • 2013-2014: £122,760
  • 2014-2015: £125,952

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Stanley Moss reads 'Song of Alphabets', 'Paper Swallow', and 'Pslam'

American poet Stanley Moss reads three of his poems from his collection No Tear is Commonplace, published by Carcanet Press (2013). Available here http://www.carcanet.co.uk/cgi-bin/indexer?product=9781847772503 The poems collected in No Tear is Commonplace stage a passionate, curious, and often combative relationship with the world and the forces that shape human life and death. Stanley Moss's range is wide: his poetry recalls the 'Adirondack wilderness' of childhood summers, imagines a young Christ learning carpentry, reflects on the tragedies of twentieth-century Europe. What shines through is the poet's commitment to the fullness of human experience in the here-and-now. 'Again and again, coming upon a poem of Stanley Moss's, I have had the feeling of being taken by surprise. Not simply by the eloquence or the direct authenticity of the language, for I had come to expect those in his poems. The surprise arose from the nature of his poetry itself, and from the mystery that his poems confront and embody, which makes them both intense and memorable.' W.S. Merwin 'It is time to celebrate the singular beauty and power of Stanley Moss's poetry... The damp genius of mortality presides.' Stanley Kunitz 'Unthinkable questions [...], but when he formulates them they take on the quiet urgency of common daylight.' John Ashbery You can find out more about Stanley and his work at www.carcanet.co.uk, where you can also order No Tear is Commonplace with a 10% discount and free UK delivery.

Alison Brackenbury - 'No'

Alison Brackenbury reads 'No', the final poem in her 2013 collection, THEN, published by Carcanet in paperback and ebook formats: http://www.carcanet.co.uk/cgi-bin/indexer?product=9781847771186 THEN draws on Alison Brackenbury's lifetime's experience of rural England, its people and its ways, and the threats to its survival. From the lapwings of her childhood Lincolnshire to the recurrent floods in Gloucestershire, where she has lived for many years, the poems reach urgently to both past and future, finding connections and disconnections. The signs of a changing climate are emblematic of larger erasures. The poems keenly focus the beauty and the harshness of the natural world. They remind us of our own fragility, and our responsibility: 'We are made of water. But we forgot.' 'Alison Brackenbury loves, lives, hymns and rhymes the natural world and its people like no other poet.' -- Gillian Clarke, National Poet of Wales You can find out more about Alison and her work at www.carcanet.co.uk, where you can also order THEN with a 10% discount and free UK delivery.

John Greening - 'To Edmund Blunden (Ypres)'

John Greening reads 'To Edmund Blunden (Ypres)', from his 2013 poetry collection, TO THE WAR POETS, published by Carcanet Press: http://www.carcanet.co.uk/cgi-bin/indexer?product=9781906188085 To Edmund Blunden (Ypres) Dear Blunden, here's a pastoral you'll appreciate, uncensored too, though I am running out of pencil and don't know what the Flemish is for sharpener. It's Brueghelesque. The Yser Canal. One angler with two rods and an (unnecessary) mud-brown brolly. A bell is tolling midday-and-beyond behind me and birdsong all around. One magpie. Two carrion crows. A far cry from the throng back in the Flanders Fields Museum. The tin helmet over the litter bin swings in the breeze beside my metal bench. There are cyclists. And a lady's terrier snaps and growls at someone's knapsack. It is all unimaginable. The great deceit of Spring. Shout, April Fool, Ypres is rubble, the dead unburied, the war's going on still... I cough and cough. But not because there's gas. In TO THE WAR POETS John Greening sends dispatches across the decades. In a sequence of verse letters he addresses the poets of the First World War directly, making connections yet always aware of distance: 'No larks, / just the passing of traffic.' Greening explores 'Englishness', but also, in his translations from German poets, goes beyond it. From the discovery of the Sutton Hoo burial in 1939 to the security forces' shut-down of Heathrow airport in 2006, the presence or threat of conflict underlies Greening's precise, unsentimental writing. '"So to conclude calamity in rest." In his powerful new collection, John Greening opens lines of communication with poets of the Great War, bridging a century with heart-work of immediacy, economy and humanity.' Penelope Shuttle 'Delightfully alert to connections and intersections, to historical ironies... [Greening is] a serious (but never excessively solemn) poet, who cares about both 'facts' and ideas and makes his poetry out of the interpenetration of the two.' Glyn Pursglove

Tara Bergin - 'At the Garage'

Tara Bergin reads her poem 'At the Garage' from her outstanding début, This is Yarrow, published by Carcanet in 2013: http://www.carcanet.co.uk/cgi-bin/indexer?product=9781847772367 The poems in Tara Bergin's début collection combine sensuous, supple lyricism with the unsettling familiarity of folklore, fairytale and dream. They are inhabited by characters who seem at first widely different from one another, yet share nervous energy, a troubled state of mind: 'I am unwell, little crow, / I am unwell and far from home / where longing lives in my house'. In This is Yarrow Bergin gathers language from a wide range of sources and places to create a music and vision entirely her own. Tara Bergin was born and grew up in Dublin. She moved to England in 2002. In 2012 she completed her PhD research at Newcastle University on Ted Hughes's translations of János Pilinszky. 'Bergin succeeds in creating a clear voice and a dramatic situation. This is Yarrow is primarily a book of monologues, establishing voices whose skewed attitudes invite an engaged critical response from the reader. The monologues are sometimes reminiscent of Paul Durcan and at other times Sylvia Plath and they can be very cutting and funny at the expense of their speakers [...]' --John McAuliffe, Irish Times

Show 21 more videos

Lucy Burnett - Giving Over Into Wings

Lucy Burnett reads her poem 'Giving Over Into Wings' at the launch of her début, LEAF GRAFFITI, at the International Anthony Burgess Foundation in Manchester on Thursday 25th July 2013. To find out about future Carcanet events, receive news, discounts and a free weekly poem, sign up to our weekly e-letter by contacting alice[at]carcanet.co.uk. www.carcanet.co.uk

Lucy Burnett reads 'Fungus' from LEAF GRAFFITI

Lucy Burnett reads her poem 'Fungus' at the launch of her début, LEAF GRAFFITI, at the International Anthony Burgess Foundation in Manchester on Thursday 25th July 2013. To find out about future Carcanet events, receive news, discounts and a free weekly poem, sign up to our weekly e-letter by contacting alice[at]carcanet.co.uk. www.carcanet.co.uk

William Letford - 'Circles'

William Letford reads his poem 'Circles' during an event with fellow poets Evan Jones and Julith Jedamus at Waterstone's Deansgate, Manchester on Wednesday 10 October 2012 as part of the Manchester Literature Festival. His acclaimed debut, BEVEL, is available now in paperback and ebook formats. William Letford has worked as a roofer, on and off, since he was fifteen years old. He has received a New Writer's Award from the Scottish Book Trust and an Edwin Morgan Travel Bursary which allowed him to spend three months in the mountains of northern Italy helping to restore a medieval village. He has an M.Litt in Creative Writing from the University of Glasgow. To find out more about William and his poetry, please go to www.carcanet.co.uk

Evan Jones - 'Constantine and Arete - An Autobiography (13)'

Evan Jones reads his poem 'Constantine and Arete - An Autobiography (13)' during an event with fellow poets William Letford and Julith Jedamus at Waterstone's Deansgate, Manchester on Wednesday 10 October 2012 as part of the Manchester Literature Festival. Evan Jones was born in Toronto. A dual citizen of Canada and Greece, he has lived in Britain since 2005. He has a PhD in English and Creative Writing from the University of Manchester and has taught at York University in Toronto, and in Britain at the University of Bolton and Liverpool John Moores University. His first collection, Nothing Fell Today But Rain (2003), was a finalist for the Governor General's Literary Award for Poetry. He is co-editor of the anthology Modern Canadian Poets (Carcanet, 2010). To find out more about Evan and his poetry, please go to www.carcanet.co.uk

William Letford - 'The Bevvy'

William Letford reads his poem 'The Bevvy' during an event with fellow poets Evan Jones and Julith Jedamus at Waterstone's Deansgate, Manchester on Wednesday 10 October 2012 as part of the Manchester Literature Festival. His acclaimed debut, BEVEL, is available now in paperback and ebook formats. William Letford has worked as a roofer, on and off, since he was fifteen years old. He has received a New Writer's Award from the Scottish Book Trust and an Edwin Morgan Travel Bursary which allowed him to spend three months in the mountains of northern Italy helping to restore a medieval village. He has an M.Litt in Creative Writing from the University of Glasgow. To find out more about William and his poetry, please go to www.carcanet.co.uk

Julith Jedamus - 'In Memory of the Photographer Wilson ''Snowflake'' Bentley....'

Julith Jedamus reads 'In Memory of the Photographer Wilson "Snowflake" Bentley, Who Died of Pneumonia after Walking through a Blizzard Near Jericho, Vermont, December 23, 1931' from her new collection, THE SWERVE, which is available now in paperback. Julith read with fellow poets William Letford and Evan Jones at Waterstone's Deansgate, Manchester on Wednesday 10 October 2012 as part of the Manchester Literature Festival. Julith Jedamus grew up in the mountains west of Boulder, Colorado. For the past sixteen years she has lived in London. She began writing novels, switched to short stories, and now writes verse, some of which was anthologised in the bestselling NEW POETRIES V (Carcanet, 2011). Her first collection, The Swerve, was published by Carcanet in May 2012. To find out more about Julith Jedamus and her poetry, go to www.carcanet.co.uk.

Gillian Clarke - 'Ice'

Gillian Clarke, National Poet of Wales, reads the title poem from her latest collection, ICE (October 2012), which is now available in paperback and ebook formats. The reading took place in Waterstone's Deansgate, Manchester, on National Poetry Day 4 October 2012. For more information on Gillian Clarke's book, please go to www.carcanet.co.uk.

Jon Glover - 'Glass Is Elastic'

Jon Glover reads the eponymous poem from his latest collection, GLASS IS ELASTIC, at the launch on 24 September 2012 at the International Anthony Burgess Foundation in Manchester. That evening also saw the launch of THE REASONER by Jeffrey Wainwright and PARALOGUES by Evan Jones. GLASS IS ELASTIC is a book of surfaces and reflections, mirrors and windows. What do we see -- what do we know -- in a world experienced through lenses and screens? 'Don't blink. Nobody's / looking, nobody's seeing.' Jon Glover explores the treachery and creativity inherent in the eye's lens, in the eyeball itself, in a microscope or camera, in a telescope, in the mysterious properties of glass, malleable as time itself. We translate the shape of the world into maps, pixels, mathematical data; into stories that change in the telling. A central poem sequence links medicine, war and vision in the glass slides assembled in a pathology lab for research into narcolepsy after the First World War, nerves and brains laid bare as evidence, as names on a war memorial. In language that combines scientific rigour with the supple everyday, Glover surprises the reader into looking, into seeing the connections in a beautiful, frightening world.

Jeffrey Wainwright - '79: History could make a stone weep'

Jeffrey Wainwright reads the 79th poem from his new collection, THE REASONER, at the booklaunch on 24 September 2012 at the International Anthony Burgess Foundation in Manchester. This event also launched GLASS IS ELASTIC by Jon Glover, and PARALOGUES by Evan Jones. In a series of ninety-five poems we listen to 'the Reasoner', a voice that is by turns ardent, despairing and comic. Petty obsessions rub against attempts at philosophical seriousness; vernacular expression vies with an intent deliberation. Above all, the Reasoner is worried. He has cherished the notion that, with thought and study, the world may be understood. But the world remains recalcitrant, elusive even in simple things like the trickeries of light on a spider's web. Language plays tricks, although it may be as complete as we can manage. History proposes and disposes of its patterns. Behind all this there may be a 'hidden order' -- and that is both a hope and a fear. Does God help us to understand any of this? Does Art? Is the 'soul' a sanctuary? The Reasoner, the reader, 'smiles ruefully and soldiers on', 'for this is not a wicked but a hard world, / and people struggle, without a scheme of things, / and deserve release.'

Evan Jones - 'Mr. Eugenides, the Smyrna Merchant'

Evan Jones reads 'Mr. Eugenides, the Smyrna Merchant' at the launch of his book PARALOGUES on 24 September 2012 at the International Anthony Burgess Foundation in Manchester. This event also launched GLASS IS ELASTIC by Jon Glover, and THE REASONER by Jeffrey Wainwright. Paralogues, which takes its title from the Greek word for 'ballads', is the British début of an original Canadian poet and editor. Evan Jones explores Greek mythology, Roman and Byzantine history, art and travel, from contemporary perspectives. The myth of Actaeon is re-imagined in three ways, and Paralogues concludes with a sequence retelling the Byzantine folk ballad 'Constantine and Arete'. Translation is central to the collection, from the modern Greek of Miltos Sachtouris to the Austrian German of Raoul Schrott. Readers encounter people and places real and imagined: the lonely figure of the poet Cavafy in Victorian Liverpool, God in post-war Paris, the landscapes of Europe and North America at once familiar and unfamiliar. You can find out more at http://www.carcanet.co.uk/cgi-bin/indexer?product=9781847771377

Oli Hazzard - 'A Few Precepts'

Oli Hazzard reads 'A Few Precepts' from his début collection, BETWEEN TWO WINDOWS (Carcanet, 2012): http://www.carcanet.co.uk/cgi-bin/indexer?product=9781847771391 The reading took place in the Events Room at Bloomsbury House in London on 12 September 2012. If you would like to find out about more Carcanet authors, books and events, please go to www.carcanet.co.uk, or sign up to our weekly e-letter by emailing info@carcanet.co.uk. You can also find us on Twitter (@Carcanet) or on Facebook.

Oli Hazzard - 'The Inability to Recall the Precise Word for Something'

Oli Hazzard reads 'The Inability to Recall the Precise Word for Something' from his début collection, BETWEEN TWO WINDOWS (Carcanet, 2012): http://www.carcanet.co.uk/cgi-bin/indexer?product=9781847771391 The reading took place in the Events Room at Bloomsbury House in London on 12 September 2012. If you would like to find out about more Carcanet authors, books and events, please go to www.carcanet.co.uk, or sign up to our weekly e-letter by emailing info@carcanet.co.uk. You can also find us on Twitter (@Carcanet) or on Facebook.

Katharine Kilalea - 'Hennecker's Ditch'

South Africa's Katharine Kilalea reads 'Hennecker's Ditch' from the New Poetries V anthology (Carcanet, 2011) at the North West Leg of Poetry Parnassus. Katharine read with New Zealand's Bill Manhire at Waterstone's Deansgate, Manchester, on 9 July 2012. To find out more about Katharine, Bill and their poetry, please go to www.carcanet.co.uk, where you can order any book with a 10% discount and free UK delivery.

Katharine Kilalea - 'Portrait of Our Death'

South Africa's Katharine Kilalea reads 'Portrait of Our Death' from her book, One Eye'd Leigh (Carcanet, 2009) at the North West Leg of Poetry Parnassus. Katharine read with New Zealand's Bill Manhire at Waterstone's Deansgate, Manchester, on 9 July 2012. To find out more about Katharine and her poetry, please go to www.carcanet.co.uk, where you can order any book with a 10% discount and free UK delivery.

Ian Pindar - 'Carvaka/Lokayata'

Ian Pindar reads his poem 'Caravaka/Lokayata' from his début collection, Emporium, which was published by Carcanet in 2011. The reading took place at the Bolton Octagon Theatre on Thursday 15 March 2012. To find out more about Ian Pindar and his poetry, please go to www.carcanet.co.uk, where you can order a copy directly from Carcanet with a 10% discount and free UK delivery. Copyright © Ian Pindar, 2011

Will Eaves - 'Ariel in Texas'

Will Eaves reads his poem 'Ariel in Texas' from his début collection, Sound Houses, which was published by Carcanet in 2011. The reading took place at the Bolton Octagon Theatre on Thursday 15 March 2012. To find out more about Will Eaves and his poetry, please go to http://www.carcanet.co.uk, where you can order his book directly from Carcanet, with a 10% discount and free UK delivery. Copyright © Will Eaves, 2011

Ian Pindar - '20'

Ian Pindar reads his poem '20' from his latest collection, Constellations, which will be published by Carcanet in May. The reading took place at the Bolton Octagon Theatre on Thursday 15 March 2012. To find out more about Ian Pindar and his poetry, please go to www.carcanet.co.uk, where you can order a copy directly from Carcanet with a 10% discount and free UK delivery. Copyright © Ian Pindar, 2012

Will Eaves - 'Silverflash'

Will Eaves reads his poem 'Silverflash' from his début collection, Sound Houses, which was published by Carcanet in 2011. 'Silverflash' was also the Guardian's Saturday Poem on Friday 2 December 2011: http://www.guardian.co.uk/books/2011/dec/02/saturday-poem-silverflash-will-eaves The reading took place at the Bolton Octagon Theatre on Thursday 15 March 2012. To find out more about Will Eaves and his poetry, please go to http://www.carcanet.co.uk, where you can order his book directly from Carcanet, with a 10% discount and free UK delivery. Copyright © Will Eaves, 2011

William Letford - 'There's hunners o burds on the roofs'

William Letford reads his poem 'There's hunners o burds on the roofs' at the launch of the bestselling anthology NEW POETRIES V on 9 November 2011. The launch was held at the International Anthony Burgess Foundation in Manchester (www.anthonyburgess.org). Letford's first full collection, BEVEL, was published by Carcanet Press in August 2012: http://www.carcanet.co.uk/cgi-bin/indexer?product=9781847771926 To browse and download our latest catalogue, go to http://www.carcanet.co.uk/cgi-bin/scribe?showinfo=ip016 To find out more about William Letford, the successful NEW POETRIES V or any other Carcanet author or title, please go to http://www.Carcanet.co.uk, where you can order all our titles with a discount and free UK delivery.

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